Tag Archives: Zach Selmes

THE TEMPEST @ THE GIANT DWARF THEATRE

 

This was an entertaining, adventurous production of one of Shakespeare’s great comedies.

The director and lead performer Alex Kendall Robson’s director’s note in the program is very illuminating. This is an excerpt from the note.

“As always with Giant Dwarf, set elements have to be kept minimal, as we essentially have to bump out after every show. So how does one then transform an Art Deco Hall in Redfern into a renaissance tropical island? You don’t. Which saves a lot of bother. I went with a carnivalesque aesthetic to match the red velvet curtain and gilded proscenium. Prospero’s own cheap and nasty circus for the damned: Mardi Gras meets Dia de los Muertos- on a budget. Prospero is a magician, literally, but is also a ringleader and puppet master; the other characters are his ‘demi-puppets’- enacting his present fancies.”

THE TEMPEST  is a story of magic and monsters, and of an enchanted island set in a distant sea. It tells of what happened in three hours on that island, when beauty and nonsense and innocence and terror clash for a time and then quiet in to a final peace under the power of a great magician Prospero, and to see it is to enter into a wonderful world which is not quite like any other that Shakespeare ever made. Continue reading THE TEMPEST @ THE GIANT DWARF THEATRE

CABARET IN THE DAY – POISONING PIGEONS IN THE PARK @ MOSMAN ART GALLERY

For the latest ( and, sad to say, last in the season for the moment ) Cabaret In the Day at Mosman Art Gallery, under the terrific direction of Melvyn Morrow we had a superb POISONING PIGEONS IN THE PARK, a deliciously witty, subversive performance celebrating the wondrous talents of singer/songwriter/social satirist Tom Lehrer.

Lehrer, now retired, was a mathematics and musical theatre lecturer and has a massive cult following. His songs often parody popular song forms although often creating original melodies while doing so. He is best known for the darkly humorous songs he recorded in the 1950s and ’60s.

In the 1960s, he produced a number of songs dealing with social and political issues of the day, particularly when he wrote for the U.S. version of the television show That Was the Week That Was. He has also translated The Wizard of OZ into Latin and this is still regarded as the standard Latin version today. Despite their topical subjects and references, his songs are still enormously popular. Especially close attention must be paid to his acerbic , witty , subversive lyrics . Continue reading CABARET IN THE DAY – POISONING PIGEONS IN THE PARK @ MOSMAN ART GALLERY