Tag Archives: Yannick Lawry

Golden Jam Presents Late Night Double Bill @ Old Fitz

whiskey-inset

Mutual mastication of Steven Berkoff’s limber lines by four performers make a meal of LUNCH, part of a two course late night fare accompanied by Andrew Bovell’s LIKE WHISKEY ON THE BREATH OF A DRUNK YOU LOVE at The Old Fitzroy.

The prologue that lead to Andrew Bovell’s Speaking in Tongues and the subsequent celebrated film, Lantana, LIKE WHISKEY ON THE BREATH OF A DRUNK YOU LOVE is the evening’s appetizer and intertwines two scenes of betrayal and seduction.

Two couples, unbeknownst to each other, both alike in infidelity, each others partner out on the tear looking for rhythmic couplings, one partner finding the others, and vice versa, creates the interlocution that precedes intercourse. The doubt, the guilt, the frisson of the forbidden, the vice like grip of vice, explored in pungent, pacey jigsaw puzzle dialogue.

From Bovell to bovver boy Berkoff, the second course is a lithe and limber lewd show with all the pyrotechnic theatrical poetics the East End Bard has built his reputation on.

Lunch and lust are near neighbours in the lexicon, both are about appetite and hunger, and Berkoff playfully merges them into a ribald romp. There’s even a bit of audience participation but nothing to knot your knickers in anticipation.

Presented by new Indie outfit, Golden Jam, and directed by Sean O’Riordan, this double bill boasts a talented line up including recent Australian College of Theatre and Television (ACTT) graduates Natalie Freeman and Nicola James alongside Edric Hong and Yannick Lawry.

LIKE WHISKEY ON THE BREATH OF A DRUNK YOU LOVE and LUNCH sadly played the Old Fitz for too short a time, playing between the 21st and 25th July.

The God Of Carnage @ The Tap

Jacki Nixon as Veronica and Yannick Lawry as Alan in the current revival of Yasmine Reza's THE GOD OF CARNAGE
Jacki Mison  as Veronica and Yannick Lawry as Alan in  Yasmina Reza’s THE GOD OF CARNAGE

I am a big fan of French playwright Yasmina Reza’s work. Reza is such a deft, subtle playwright. Out of the simplest of situations she creates poetic, poignant theatre.

In  her most well known play ART (1994) a professional man in his thirties has bought a hugely expensive painting, an abstract work of art, that he hangs oin the main wall in his living room. He invites his two best friends, also professional men, over for a catch up and to get their opinion of this latest acquisition. His two friends are aghast. They can’t believe their best mate has spent so much money in what they see as a vacuous, indulgent artwork. And so begins a play that has ripples of meaning going everywhere. The play ends up being very little about art and a lot about friendships and their very fragile nature. Continue reading The God Of Carnage @ The Tap

Journey’s End

RC Sheriff’s play Journey’s End theatretroupe
Andrew George plays Captain Stanhope and Jermey Bridie plays Officer HIbbert in R.C. Sherriff’s classic war drama, JOURNEY’S END

British playwright R.C. Sherriff’s drama JOURNEY’S END presents a detailed and harrowing account of the hell that is war fought in the trenches.

A classic of its genre, Sherriff’s play was wrought out of his  experiences as an officer in the trenches during the First World War. The play was first performed on the 9th December 1928 at London’s Apollo Theatre, in a production by  the Incorporated Stage Society, and starred a very young Laurence Olivier.

The setting is Saint-Quentin, Aisne, France, at a British Army infantry officers’ dugout located just 75 yards from enemy trenches during four days, between the 18th March and the 21st March, 1918, poised very close to the end of the War. It focuses on the interactions between five officers and the Colonel, and depicts the camaraderie between the officers with poignancy. Continue reading Journey’s End

BRAD CHECKED IN

Living in the mobile world. Pic Katy Green Loughrey
Daniel Bunton as Grub and Yannick Lawry as Brad forever on their mobiles. Pic Katy Green Loughrey

“There’s a new world that both compliments and conspires against our own – the digital world” says writer Paula Noble, describing a ‘key stroke’ for a very noble effort that opened at the Old Fitz last night. While Director Steven Tait hopes that “audiences leave the Old Fitzroy, not simply satisfied with an enjoyable theatrical experience, but with the basis for starting a new conversation with each other.”

As you’ll see in the program notes, Brad has relinquished a torturous relationship with control freak wife, Maggie and prompted by best friend ,Grub, ‘checks in’ on Facebook to find new relationships. He doesn’t have to wait long as Di, a rather ravishing and predatory (and attached) blonde bombshell ‘explodes’ on the scene looking for mischief, followed inevitably by her menacing, jealous husband who is actually not far of the mark, (literally when he tries to rearrange Brad’s face!) Rebecca, a young ‘old flame’ (also attached), who’s never really got over being rejected by Brad, returns for a second tilt, and jilt! But current wife Maggie hasn’t accepted separation either and moves back in to re-stake her claim (or maybe Brad’s heart?)

Continue reading BRAD CHECKED IN