Tag Archives: Scott Eveleigh

STOOGED THEATRE PRESENTS PUNK ROCK BY SIMON STEPHENS @ CIVIC PLAYHOUSE NEWCASTLE

 

Georgia Hicks-Jones, Jerry Ray, Paul Predny, Charlotte De Wit Photo Glen Waterhouse
Georgia Hicks-Jones, Jerry Ray, Paul Predny, Charlotte De Wit Photo Glen Waterhouse

When you were at school where did you fit? Were you one of the nerds, a jock, an insecure loner, a leader, badass, bully, bullied, teachers pet or just disinterested and desperate to leave. I used to call them Tribes of the Playground – all the sets and sub sets of the weird societies that the school system throws together in an adolescent survival of the fittest.

The 7 main characters of Simon Stephen’s PUNK ROCK initially appear to represent some of the stereotypes of teenagers on the cusp of final exams and ultimate adulthood. Set in a Grammar school near Manchester in England, it could easily have followed down the path of the The Breakfast Club with a message of acceptance and understanding of difference and unlikely friendships between the brainiac, the tough natural leader, the insecure girl, the hot chick, sweet but troubled boy, the jock and the new girl. Continue reading STOOGED THEATRE PRESENTS PUNK ROCK BY SIMON STEPHENS @ CIVIC PLAYHOUSE NEWCASTLE

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE

 Tim O'Donnell as Bassanio, Scott Eveleigh as Salanio and Glen Waterhouse as Antonio. Photo - Mat Lee
Tim O’Donnell as Bassanio, Scott Eveleigh as Salanio and Glen Waterhouse as Antonio. Photo – Mat Lee

The first recorded performance of The Merchant of Venice was 10th February 1605. The themes of racial and religious hatred, money, marriage and mercy all still reverberate as soundly today as they did in 1605.

The context has undoubtedly changed; the 17th century fission between Christianity and Judaism resonates far less today, but the cold war between two powerful men of money is as fresh and smelly as it has ever been.

STOOGED THEATRE has presented a production that breathes new life into this classic text. With a few theatrical tweaks and contemporary references, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE becomes a media savvy play about money and politics and taking down your political opponents using the law as your weapon. Random pen drops on a newspaper will supply any number of current examples to support that theme.

Continue reading THE MERCHANT OF VENICE