Tag Archives: Rachel Chant

THE APOLOGISTS: THE PUBLIC APOLOGY SEEN AS A SOLO PERFORMANCE

A Secretary of State for Health and Social Care makes a racist comment to her attending doctor  when her child is rushed into hospital; a prominent travel writer is held responsible for a suicide after a scathing review; an employee of an aid organisation demands the recompense she truly needs from the CEO after a disingenuous public apology. 

The Apologists is a probes the meaning of the act of apology, the complex power play at work between the giver and the receiver of an apology, and whether we are responsible for the context of our actions.  Each solo story focuses on a female character, a high-profile woman, and the issues raised also shine a light on gender inequality and social justice. 

After a highly successful tour of the UK, Unlikely Productions is bringing The Apologists to Sydney,  starring acclaimed Australian actress Gabrielle Scawthorn in a striking solo performance. Continue reading THE APOLOGISTS: THE PUBLIC APOLOGY SEEN AS A SOLO PERFORMANCE

BONDI FESTIVAL WILL BE BACK IN 2021

Waverley Council’s celebration of arts and culture – Bondi Festival – will now be held in winter 2021. 

The decision to postpone the event planned for 26 September – 10 October 2020 follows a review of the most up-to-date advice regarding COVID-19 restrictions. 

Festival Co-Director Rachel Chant said when the Council first announced its festival dates for 2020, all signs indicated that with some alterations to the offering and a rigorous safety plan, a physical festival would still be able to go ahead. 

“However, these are changing and challenging times, and in the current environment we want to ensure we’re doing everything we can to minimise the spread of COVID-19, even if that means canceling this year’s event,” Ms Chant said. 

“Albeit disappointing, the team at Bondi Festival know this is the only responsible decision, as the health and safety of our community is our top priority. We are looking forward to planning a wonderful offering next year.” 

Festival Co-Director Phil Spencer added: “We had explored putting on a completely virtual Festival, but Bondi Festival is intrinsically tied to the iconic suburb in which it takes place.  

“The feeling was the Festival wouldn’t translate online as well as it would do live and we were better off postponing to next year when we can return with a bang”. 

Mayor of Waverley, Paula Masselos, said Bondi Festival will return in winter 2021 as vibrant as ever. 

“We are so looking forward to bringing Bondi Festival to Sydney to celebrate the incredible art and entertainment on our doorstep and against the backdrop of Australia’s most famous beach,” Mayor Masselos said. 

 

 

Continue reading BONDI FESTIVAL WILL BE BACK IN 2021

GOOD DOG @ KINGS CROSS THEATRE

Actor and playwright, Arinze Kene, began to write his monologue ‘GOOD DOG’ during the London Riots of 2011, which began in Tottenham and spread through England, resulting in looting, arson, mugging, assault and murder over 6 days.  The play was first produced in the UK in 2017 and is set in the decade leading up to the London Riots.

We meet 13 year old Boy, (Justin Amankwah), a sensitive and kind teenager who lives with his mum in a council flat in Tottenham, North London.  His father has left them, but, ever optimistic, he treasures his dad’s advice, ‘Good things come to good people’.

He starts his neighbourhood story looking down from his balcony at the familiar characters he has found affection for – even though he is mocked and bullied by the “smoking boys” and the shoplifting teenagers he calls the “what-what girls”, as “what” is their only word of choice.  Although he sees a landscape scarred by violence and poverty, his sense of humour is endearing and Amankwah throws Boy’s comic lines away with a natural indifference that works for him. Continue reading GOOD DOG @ KINGS CROSS THEATRE

MOTH : FRAGILE ADOLESCENT LIVES EXPOSED IN DECLAN GREENE’S NEW PLAY

 

Production photography by Rupert Reid Photography.

Darkness edges the two figures who appear before us. The shadowy stage lights have crept up to wash the tiny downstage area with a yellow tinged late afternoon falling. They are hard to make out these two schoolkids with their bored skatepark slouching. The effort of peering seems to blur them more.

They will pull us, disturbed and fearful for them, into their fragile, adolescent lives in ninety minutes of engrossing theatre yet the playwright, director and cast of MOTH (atyp) conspire to be unreliable narrators. Claryssa and Sebastian will never really take shape. They will flutter just beyond our understanding and will beat their wings wildly to warn us away. At the end of the play, as these creations melt back into darkness and we emerge blinking into the light, we are slow and panicky in our anxiety for the young people around us and the world we are leaving them. Continue reading MOTH : FRAGILE ADOLESCENT LIVES EXPOSED IN DECLAN GREENE’S NEW PLAY

THAT EYE, THE SKY @ NEW THEATRE NEWTOWN

Sky2

 

THAT EYE, THE SKY has been lovingly adapted from the Tim Winton novel and brought to the stage by Richard Roxburgh and Justin Monjo and directed by David Burrowes. It is beautifully, eloquently written and the show is extremely polished with an incredibly talented cast but the work is mostly cerebal and we feel distanced observers. The play asks the big questions about the nature of religion and the meaning of Life and Death.

Continue reading THAT EYE, THE SKY @ NEW THEATRE NEWTOWN