Tag Archives: Nate Edmonson

DOUG WRIGHT’S ‘I AM MY OWN WIFE’ @ THE OLD FITZ THEATRE

Ben Gerrard gives a stellar performance in a very exacting role. Production photography by Rupert Reid
Ben Gerrard gives a stellar performance in a very exacting role. Production photography by Rupert Reid

Theatre doesn’t get much better than this. The old Fitz theatre is currently home to a revival of American playwright Doug Wright’s play I AM MY OWN WIFE, first performed Off Broadway in 2003, and then went on to take the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in the following year.

With painstaking research Wright’s play brings vividly to the stage a remarkable character by the name of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf (1926-2000).

Charlotte was a flamboyant gay transsexual who lived her  colourful life out on the streets of Berlin. She wrote a best selling autobiography, and became a figure of great folklore in the great German  city.

In bringing his play together, Wright conducted several lengthy interviews with Charlotte from 1992 to 1994.  The playwright also took into account newspaper accounts of her life, Charlotte’s interactions with key people in her life, and he also sighted the controversial Stasi file held by the East German Secret Police. Continue reading DOUG WRIGHT’S ‘I AM MY OWN WIFE’ @ THE OLD FITZ THEATRE

Misterman @ The Old Fitzroy Theatre

Kate Gaul seems to be the go to gal when it comes to staging Irish playwright Enda Walsh’s plays in Sydney.

Following on fromThe New Electric Ballroom at The Stables and Penelope at Tap Gallery, Gaul mounts MISTERMAN at The Old Fitzroy and scores a hat trick.

Funny bleak in the way so much Irish theatre and literature is, MISTERMAN has a not so oblique antecedence from Krapp’s Last Tape with its solitary protagonist and its use of  reel to reel  recorders. Continue reading Misterman @ The Old Fitzroy Theatre

MUSIC

Tom Stokes, Kate Skinner and Anthony Gee in MUSIC. Pic Kurt Sneddon
Sarah (Kate Skinner) and Gavin (Tom Stokes) try to reach out to a disorientated Adam (Anthony Gee) in Jane Bodie’s new dramatic work, MUSIC. Pic by Kurt Sneddon

My experience over many years of quickly skimming a writer’s program notes in the theatre foyer before heading into a show is that generally they are written in a very dry, bland manner.

This accounts for the reason why I was completely blown away by Jane Bodie’s writer’s note for her new play MUSIC currently playing at Kings Cross’s Stables theatre.

Continue reading MUSIC

ROMEO AND JULIET (STC)

Dylan Young and Eryn Jean Norvill plays the star crossed lovers. Pic Lisa Tomasetti
Dylan Young and Eryn Jean Norvill plays the star crossed lovers. Pic Lisa Tomasetti

With Kip Williams’s current production of R and J audiences get  a bold, brash and powerful reworking of the Bard’s star crossed lovers tale.

Everything is big and dramatic and  vivid as…one suspect that he was more than a little encouraged by Bazmark’s film to do something similar in a theatrical vein.

Plenty of dollars have been spent on the set and staging,- David Fleischer- which features multiple revolves and ‘boxed’ sets, and the costumes- Anna Lise Phillips as Juliet’s mother comes out in a lavish, extreme pink dress- everywhere there is opulence…extravagance.

Alan John’s, together with Nate Edmonson’s, soundscape works in well with the narrative, mixing cutting edge music bytes with orchestral tones.

Williams’s production, with lighting man Nicholas Rayment’s work, is visually stunning. Williams’s staging is excellent. The scene where Juliet is at the deep back of the theatre in just the barest of lighting, as she waits for Romeo’s appearance is mesmeric.

As is Eamon Farren as he makes his dramatic entrance, full of bravado, that kicks off the second half.

As the star crossed lovers, Eryn Jean Norvill and Dylan Young shine brightly. During the show they have to make some direct audiences from the front centre of the stage and they do so confidently and with eloquent phrasing.

Others to stand out in the cast include some highly experienced performers,- Colin Moody as Juliet’s Dad, Julie Forsyth as her Nurse and Mitchell Butel as the Friar.

Highly recommended, this Sydney Theatre Company production runs at the Drama Theatre, Sydney Opera House until November 2. It is a long night, running over two and a half hours, but worth every minute.