Tag Archives: Lachlan Philpott

LOST BOYS – A PRODUCTION FOR REMEMBERING

Production photography: Zak Kaczmarek

80, the program says 80.  “Why the hell hasn’t it come out… there must be people out there, like Tracy, who know.”  At a very civilised breakfast overlooking the lighthouse on the beach in Wollongong, my friend was getting really worked up, unusual given how much theatre she sees.  We had been to LOST BOYS the night before, it’s playing at the Illawarra Performing Arts Centre, and we were haunted by the physical beauty of the show and somewhat disoriented by the pervasive whiff of a slightly paranoid, hunted feeling.

Gay people were chased, beaten and killed by teenage gangs in Sydney beachside suburbs from the late 1970s to the mid 1990s and LOST BOYS, from writer Lachlan Philpott, has crash tackled and wrestled the issue into the limelight.  Though there have been other TV and theatre around the topic, LOST BOYS puts the perpetrators front and centre with a chilling normalcy. Continue reading LOST BOYS – A PRODUCTION FOR REMEMBERING

INTERVIEW WITH LACHLAN PHILPOTT ON HIS NEW PLAY – ‘LOST BOYS’

Lachlan Philpott
Images © SHANANEIRA

This May and June, Merrigong Theatre Company will present a brand new Australian work inspired by a shocking chapter in recent Australian history. Examining the heinous murders of dozens of gay men in Sydney in the 1980s. LOST BOYS  is a fierce and compelling new play , specially commissioned and developed by Merrigong Theatre Company.   Continue reading INTERVIEW WITH LACHLAN PHILPOTT ON HIS NEW PLAY – ‘LOST BOYS’

‘Silent Disco’ – Lives Coloured by Unreliable Narration

Production images: Chris Lundie

It is most common stuck in traffic I think.  Glancing across at someone car dancing and wondering what they are dancing to.  They wiggle and head bang in a world of their own, caught up by the irresistibility of rhythm or the thump of bass.  It leads me to wonder …  what is beneath their choice to block out the world and have that tiny moment of pure self.   SILENT DISCO, written by Sydney playwright Lachlan Philpott,  playing at the New Theatre is like that.  We see what they do, how they move in the world.  But understanding them through what they say is tricky … it’s all coloured by the unreliable narration of Tamara.  Continue reading ‘Silent Disco’ – Lives Coloured by Unreliable Narration

Chain Play @ Bangarra Studio Theatre Sydney Theatre Company

One of the doyens of Australian playwriting David Williamson has contributed to Playwriting Australia's group play fundraiser
One of the doyennes of Australian playwriting David Williamson has contributed to Playwriting Australia’s group play experiment

Playwriting Australia, the national organisation supporting new writing for the stage, is presenting the inaugural Chain Play, a celebrity fundraising gala crammed with the best playwrights and theatre artists from around the country.

Twenty of Australia’s most exciting and celebrated playwrights will join forces to offer Sydney audiences a raucous night of group creativity.

The way that CHAIN PLAY works is that each writer has been asked to contribute a scene of a brand new play. Once the nominated playwright has written the opening scene then he/she passes the play onto the next playwright to write their scene and so it goes until the play has been completed. Continue reading Chain Play @ Bangarra Studio Theatre Sydney Theatre Company

Lachlan Philpott’s THE CHOSEN

The Chosen - TANTRUM Youth Theatre

To be chosen by others always makes one feel special. To be the soloist, on the team, a friend, a girlfriend or boyfriend, a representative. Being singled out is a gift of self-worth that even the most bashful or shy enjoys.But what if your special chosen status is beyond the realms of belief by others? Your best friend, chosen by you, has a strong spiritual faith and belief in God but struggles with believing your stories of alien abduction and the theory that your father was taken as well.

Lachlan Philpott’s latest play, THE CHOSEN, is a multi-layered and deceptively complex work that focuses on the isolated Freya, played by a perfectly cast Belinda Hodgson. Recently relocated with her mum (Chloe McKinnon) and younger brother, Tiddy (Kelty O’Shea) to Grove Grammar in Brisbane from a list of other places, including Andromeda, Freya has become very used to her status as the bullied outcast at school. Her raging skin condition, which she attempts to hide by wearing jumpers in summer, makes her an instant target for the ubiquitous bullying tribe. Continue reading Lachlan Philpott’s THE CHOSEN

M.ROCK

Valerie Bader as Mabel and Clementine Mills as Tracey in M. ROCK. Pic LIsa Tomasetti
Valerie Bader as Mabel and Clementine Mills as Tracey in M. ROCK. Pic LIsa Tomasetti

Is the divide that has always existed between the generations growing greater and greater as advancements in technology make further and further inroads into our lives?

I think that it would be fair to say that popular opinion would very much answer this question in the affirmative.

One of Australia’s finest young playwrights, Lachlan Philpott, throws a different, brighter light on this whole issue with his new play, M.ROCK. The play’s romantic notion is that the universal love of music has the power to bridge the gap between the generations.

Continue reading M.ROCK