Tag Archives: Kate Skinner

Through These Lines

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As we lead into the 100th Anniversary of the ANZAC tradition, established in Gallipoli through the fierce bravery and camaraderie displayed by the Australian and New Zealand troops under the most appalling conditions, we welcome the opportunity to be reminded of the stories of these soldiers and their sacrifice. However, there were also Australian and New Zealand women who endured hardship and experienced great trauma during WW1, – the nurses. It is heartening to see their stories are being told as well, without gloss or glamour.

THROUGH THESE LINES writer and ensemble member, Cheryl Ward (she plays the fair but strict Matron Ada Watson) demonstrates extensive research and effective manipulation of techniques and emotions to bring to life the story of Sister Florence Whiting, (Kate Skinner). Continue reading Through These Lines

MUSIC

Tom Stokes, Kate Skinner and Anthony Gee in MUSIC. Pic Kurt Sneddon
Sarah (Kate Skinner) and Gavin (Tom Stokes) try to reach out to a disorientated Adam (Anthony Gee) in Jane Bodie’s new dramatic work, MUSIC. Pic by Kurt Sneddon

My experience over many years of quickly skimming a writer’s program notes in the theatre foyer before heading into a show is that generally they are written in a very dry, bland manner.

This accounts for the reason why I was completely blown away by Jane Bodie’s writer’s note for her new play MUSIC currently playing at Kings Cross’s Stables theatre.

Continue reading MUSIC

SLUTTERATI

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Matt Charleston gives a strong performance as television presenter Dan Newman

Part of the Sydney Fringe, SLUTTERATI by Michael Gottsche has been developed with the assistance of the New Theatre where it is currently being performed. Under Louise Fischer’s sure direction, the excellent cast bring to life the biting, satirical script (which – warning – has lots of strong language) .The narrative is told clearly and the plot structure is quite strong.

SLUTTERATI lampoons the narcissistic obsessiveness of the age of ‘celebrity’ and with a dark twist reveals a delicate personal story hidden underneath the superficial world of vanity and ambition. Who (if anyone) can you really trust? It is about the continual rise of gossip as ‘news’ and its insidious omnipresence in today’s society, how ‘news’ is not simple reportage of major events but in synch with commercial sponsorship.

The set is quite sparse, – a sofa, several TVs, a desk and chairs. The scene changes, and there are lots of quick scene changes, are handled very smoothly, and in a quite cinematic way.

Very handsome Matt Charleston gives a strong performance as Dan Paul Newman, a TV presenter who is caught in a world of rather inane TV programs, B Grade celebrity colleagues and boring parties. In the lead up to the Olympics, Newman wants to remind people he once was a top Olympic swimmer. But in a wave of a series of embarrassing scandals he discovers how quickly and easily his reputation can be smashed and his career crashes badly.

It is all about ‘face’ and manipulation of the media as organised through Clark, his manager. Can the situation be saved? There is a sharp, almost Brechtian ‘nightmare’ scene, very well presented, where everything in Newman’s world comes crashing down.

Stephen Wilkinson as Clark, Newman’s likable yet seedy, quite  shady manager with a criminal background, gives the play some of its tensest moments. He brings a feeling of urgency to the story and makes us believe that the stakes are very high.

Others in the cast include Rebecca Clay who plays Talia-Jayne, an early-evening commercial television presenter colleague of Newman’s, who regards herself as a serious journalist. With a toothy smile she certainly confidently looks the part, yet underneath is constantly aware of her superficiality .Her elegant, blow-waved, narcissistic self importance is underlined with a hint of caring phoniness.

As Angela, his harassed first agent, Jorjia Gillis was terrific. The cleaner, Lily, who gets to know Dan Paul quite intimately, yet at the same time not at all, was well played by Kate Skinner. The theoretical division between Personal and Professional lives and confidentiality was stressed .And Amy Fisher was terrific as Amy Dunn, whose kiss and tell TV interview, sparks a crisis.

A timely, very cutting analysis and critique of current media issues. Running time 75 minutes straight through.

Michel Gottsche’s SLUTTERATI ran at the New Theatre, King Street, Newtown between September 19 and 23, 2013.