Tag Archives: Kate Gaul

THE MOORS: WELL, I LOVED IT!

Production images -Clare Hawley

It really isn’t going to be for everyone but I adored THE MOORS.  The black humour grabbed my jaded funny bone and wrestled in into a very odd shape.  Plus, weirdly, my typhus must have been acting up because I could hardly breathe in places.  It is a deliciously detailed production which, despite being non-sequitur free, is alarmingly disorienting and it’s ferociously feminist and with some remarkably troubling hits over the head with a Bronte.  And an easy to follow narrative … go figure.

It begins with a nunnunnunnah. And from there on Nate Edmondson’s audio design leaves no clichéd audio cue unreferenced.  It takes the horrible from horror with a score which interlaces plunks and a distant pipe strike and swirls of strings and a contrapuntal discordancy in places.  It never overwhelms and even has a bell motif that rings distant from a hillock through the fog!  Continue reading THE MOORS: WELL, I LOVED IT!

BRIELLE FLYNN INTERVIEWED ABOUT THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED PRODUCTION ‘THE MOORS’

This image: Brielle Flynn
Featured image: Brielle and Enya Daly in rehearsal for THE MOORS. Photo credit – Clare Hawley

The Sydney premiere of THE MOORS by Jen Silverman and directed by Kate Gaul, looms darkly through the fog before its opening to previews on February 7.

After being lured by mysterious letters, Emilie takes the position of governess in a household on the forbidding moors. Upon arriving, she finds two sisters – the stern and domineering Agatha, and the needy and flighty Hudley – a dog, and a glowering maid who isn’t always who or what she seems. Emilie’s arrival sets this odd assembly on a strange and increasingly bizarre path.

Inspired by the lives of the Brontë sisters, THE MOORS is a black comedy about love, desperation, and the way women are seen.

We had the opportunity to annoy cast member Brielle Flynn, who plays the hapless Emilie, while she was fog-deep in production week.

SAG:              Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.  So, there are 4 women and a dog in the cast?  I’m assuming The Moors passes the Bechdel test?

BRIELLE:      Make that 4 women, a dog and a moor-hen! I think the great thing about this play is that it highlights a universal need for connection, happiness, independence and visibility – a need that goes beyond human relationships, but also one’s connection to their sense of place. Continue reading BRIELLE FLYNN INTERVIEWED ABOUT THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED PRODUCTION ‘THE MOORS’

THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY : A MARVELLOUSLY COHESIVE PRODUCTION BY SIREN THEATRE COMPANY

Nothing is as it seems in THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY. From the obscuring haze of thick smoke as we enter the theatre to the delicately constructed dance of death that concludes the work, people and events are viewed through a glass darkly. A mirror, a lens, a dirty window pane perhaps. There is an obstinate obfuscation in Lachlan Philpott’s text and Director Kate Gaul has successfully pulled the story from the page without exposing it to the full light. Like the magnesium flashpowder of the antique photographer’s T which will give light to a sepia photograph, there are puffs of understanding dispersed in a stillness of wondering.

THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY is a highly theatrical interpretation of a true story. Harry Crawford was arrested in July 1920 for the October 1917 murder of his wife, Annie. Her charred remains had been found near the Lane Cove River at Chatswood where she and Harry had been picnicking. When taken to the police station, Harry asked to be taken to the female cells and it was revealed that he was in fact Eugenia Falleni, assigned female at birth. Harry had been living as cisgender man since he had run away to sea as a very young person.

The image on Siren CT’s poster is from the Historic Houses Trust held mugshot and there have been exhibitions and articles, books and podcasts about the case in our own time. But it is the morbid curiosity, malice and prurient interest of the public at the time of Harry’s trial that allows us so many records about the case. Continue reading THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY : A MARVELLOUSLY COHESIVE PRODUCTION BY SIREN THEATRE COMPANY

Misterman @ The Old Fitzroy Theatre

Kate Gaul seems to be the go to gal when it comes to staging Irish playwright Enda Walsh’s plays in Sydney.

Following on fromThe New Electric Ballroom at The Stables and Penelope at Tap Gallery, Gaul mounts MISTERMAN at The Old Fitzroy and scores a hat trick.

Funny bleak in the way so much Irish theatre and literature is, MISTERMAN has a not so oblique antecedence from Krapp’s Last Tape with its solitary protagonist and its use of  reel to reel  recorders. Continue reading Misterman @ The Old Fitzroy Theatre

Steve Rogers takes out the inaugural Lysicrates Prize

Inset pic- Photo 6861 Premier Mike Baird announces Steve Rogers as the winner of the first Lysicrates Prize in front of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates at the Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney. Featured pic- In front of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates at the Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney after Premier Mike Baird’s announcement:-Lee Lewis, Artistic Director Griffin Theatre Company, Finance Minister Dominic Perrottet, Environment Minister Rob Stokes, Patricia Azarias, Kim Ellis, Executive Director, Botanic Gardens and Centennial Parklands, John Azarias

On Friday, 30th January 2015,  Steve Rodgers was awarded the inaugural Lysicrates Prize, receiving a full $12,500 Griffin Theatre Company commission, as voted by audience at Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music.  The Lysicrates Prize was founded by Patricia and John Azarias, in conjunction with Griffin Theatre Company and the Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney. Mike Baird – Premier NSW, Luke Foley – NSW Opposition Leader, and Industry Leaders were amongst the audience.

Steve Rodgers was amongst three finalists who were shortlisted to submit the first act of a new play. The two runners-up Justin Fleming and Lally Katz each received a $1,000 cash prize. This innovative new Australian playwriting competition was inspired by the imminent restoration of an historic monument in Sydney’s Royal Botanic Garden: The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates.

Continue reading Steve Rogers takes out the inaugural Lysicrates Prize

Four Dogs And A Bone

Sonny Vrebac and Melinda Dransfield in John Patrick Shanley 's FOUR DOGS AND A BONE. Pic Katy Green-Loughrey
Sonny Vrebac and Melinda Dransfield in FOUR DOGS AND A BONE. Pic Katy Green-Loughrey

American playwright John Patrick Shanley’s play FOUR DOGS AND A BONE (1993) is theatrical take on a filmic confection.  There are only four scenes in the play, four characters and the bone of the title is the unnamed film in which they are all involved.

We are introduced to an evidently West Coast airhead actress, Brenda (Melinda Dransfield) discussing her current film with the producer, Bradley (Sonny Vrebac).  Brenda’s famous step brother is one of the main topics of conversation.  What he and his friends can do for the film.  Brenda name drops a famous family friend with whom she has script consulted and she has copious notes on how to fix the movie.  Brenda and Bradley agree that the best solution is to reduce the role played by Collette (Amanda Collins).  Collette meanwhile has engineered a drunken meeting with Victor, (Paul Gerrard) the writer.  He has just lost his mother and is depressed, loveless and verklempt.  Collette and Victor agree that the best solution is to reduce the role played by Brenda.  Continue reading Four Dogs And A Bone

THE VIOLENT OUTBURST THAT DREW ME TO YOU

Emily Ayoub and Michael Cutrupi. Pic Heidrun Lohr
Emily Ayoub and Michael Cutrupi. Pic Heidrun Lohr

The subject of Finegan Kruckemeyer’s THE VIOLENT OUTBURST THAT DREW ME TO YOU is the turbulent, whirlwind world of adolescence.

The focus is on troubled adolescent, Conor. For Conor, his world started turning upside down when he turned 16. Everyone started getting on his nerves. His mum, his dad, his teachers, even his best mate.

Lately, he hasn’t been able to help himself. He keeps on picking fights, slamming doors, even flipping desks. Conor’s parents try various unsuccessful approaches including getting him to move in with his Uncle and Auntie, in ultimate frustration, his parents dump him alone in their place in the middle of a forest for a week.

This little zinger of a play is well served by Kate Gaul’s very theatrical style of production. There’s a very physical style of performing, a good use of puppetry, lighting and shadow effects, the soundscape works well. Jasmine Christie’s colourful costumes suited the characters well.

The play captures beautifully the freewheeling, zany, adventurous, exuberant and flighty nature of this period of life.

My favourite scene was a wonderfully poetic moment Connor and his girlfriend Lotte are having an argument. Lotte is insisting Connor become more adventurous. Connor decides to ‘follow’ Lotte. The rest of the cast put chairs in front of him that he climbs over to get to her and they continue their adventures.

Michael Cutrupi gives a very impressive, credible performance as the troubled Conor. His fine supporting cast each confidently play multiple roles; with Emily Ayoub and Anthony Weir primarily playing Conor’s mum and dad, and Emily Ayoub, Renee Heys and Natalie Ladyko each having time playing the radical Lotte.

Recommended, a co-production of the Siren Theatre Company, Griffin Independent and InPlay Arts, Finegan Kruckmeyer’s THE VIOLENT OUTBURST THAT DREW ME TO YOU opened at the SBW Stables Theatre, 10 Nimrod Street, Kings Cross on Friday 20th June and plays until Saturday 12th July. Running time 70 minutes without interval.