Tag Archives: John Patrick Shanley

Four Dogs And A Bone

Sonny Vrebac and Melinda Dransfield in John Patrick Shanley 's FOUR DOGS AND A BONE. Pic Katy Green-Loughrey
Sonny Vrebac and Melinda Dransfield in FOUR DOGS AND A BONE. Pic Katy Green-Loughrey

American playwright John Patrick Shanley’s play FOUR DOGS AND A BONE (1993) is theatrical take on a filmic confection.  There are only four scenes in the play, four characters and the bone of the title is the unnamed film in which they are all involved.

We are introduced to an evidently West Coast airhead actress, Brenda (Melinda Dransfield) discussing her current film with the producer, Bradley (Sonny Vrebac).  Brenda’s famous step brother is one of the main topics of conversation.  What he and his friends can do for the film.  Brenda name drops a famous family friend with whom she has script consulted and she has copious notes on how to fix the movie.  Brenda and Bradley agree that the best solution is to reduce the role played by Collette (Amanda Collins).  Collette meanwhile has engineered a drunken meeting with Victor, (Paul Gerrard) the writer.  He has just lost his mother and is depressed, loveless and verklempt.  Collette and Victor agree that the best solution is to reduce the role played by Brenda.  Continue reading Four Dogs And A Bone

Danny and the Deep Blue Sea

Karli Evans and Wade Doolan play two lost souls who make connection in the 30th anniversary year of John Patrick Shanley's classic play
Karli Evans and Wade Doolan play two lost souls who make connection in the 30th anniversary year of John Patrick Shanley’s classic play

Staging theatre in a pub is a good fit. Drama and bars complement each other well and the performance of John Patrick Shanley’s 30 year old New York play DANNY AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA in the Roxbury Hotel, St John’s Road, Glebe, works exceptionally well. The first act is set in a bar and initially the audience is not quite sure if Danny (excellent performance from Wade Doolan) is an actor or a drunken patron.

Danny’s banter with the play’s only other character, Roberta (skilfully realised by Karli Evans), soon assures us that is in fact theatre and we can enjoy the ebb and flow of the drama. The characters’ tones and attitudes oscillate between disinterest, antagonism, affection and amusement and following the variations in these states is very engrossing.

Continue reading Danny and the Deep Blue Sea