Tag Archives: Jodie Le Vesconte

LOST BOYS – A PRODUCTION FOR REMEMBERING

Production photography: Zak Kaczmarek

80, the program says 80.  “Why the hell hasn’t it come out… there must be people out there, like Tracy, who know.”  At a very civilised breakfast overlooking the lighthouse on the beach in Wollongong, my friend was getting really worked up, unusual given how much theatre she sees.  We had been to LOST BOYS the night before, it’s playing at the Illawarra Performing Arts Centre, and we were haunted by the physical beauty of the show and somewhat disoriented by the pervasive whiff of a slightly paranoid, hunted feeling.

Gay people were chased, beaten and killed by teenage gangs in Sydney beachside suburbs from the late 1970s to the mid 1990s and LOST BOYS, from writer Lachlan Philpott, has crash tackled and wrestled the issue into the limelight.  Though there have been other TV and theatre around the topic, LOST BOYS puts the perpetrators front and centre with a chilling normalcy. Continue reading LOST BOYS – A PRODUCTION FOR REMEMBERING

THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY : A MARVELLOUSLY COHESIVE PRODUCTION BY SIREN THEATRE COMPANY

Nothing is as it seems in THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY. From the obscuring haze of thick smoke as we enter the theatre to the delicately constructed dance of death that concludes the work, people and events are viewed through a glass darkly. A mirror, a lens, a dirty window pane perhaps. There is an obstinate obfuscation in Lachlan Philpott’s text and Director Kate Gaul has successfully pulled the story from the page without exposing it to the full light. Like the magnesium flashpowder of the antique photographer’s T which will give light to a sepia photograph, there are puffs of understanding dispersed in a stillness of wondering.

THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY is a highly theatrical interpretation of a true story. Harry Crawford was arrested in July 1920 for the October 1917 murder of his wife, Annie. Her charred remains had been found near the Lane Cove River at Chatswood where she and Harry had been picnicking. When taken to the police station, Harry asked to be taken to the female cells and it was revealed that he was in fact Eugenia Falleni, assigned female at birth. Harry had been living as cisgender man since he had run away to sea as a very young person.

The image on Siren CT’s poster is from the Historic Houses Trust held mugshot and there have been exhibitions and articles, books and podcasts about the case in our own time. But it is the morbid curiosity, malice and prurient interest of the public at the time of Harry’s trial that allows us so many records about the case. Continue reading THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY : A MARVELLOUSLY COHESIVE PRODUCTION BY SIREN THEATRE COMPANY