Tag Archives: Jo Turner

THE HYPOCHONDRIAC @ THE ETERNITY PLAYHOUSE

If you’re sick of hibernating in the colder weather, then seeing THE HYPOCHONDRIAC by Moliere will remedy your malady and beat those Winter blues.

Hilary Bell has contemporised this farcical and satirical, classic play which was originally titled ‘The Imaginary Invalid’. Hers  is a fresh and fun approach, a riotous romp through the past and present day.  The production has been directed by Jo Turner.

The play premiered in 1673  and turned out to be Moliere’s final play. Moliere actually played the main role of Argan and ironically became very ill during a performance, collapsing with a tubercular seizure, and the curtain was rung down. He was taken home, never recovered and was dead within  a few days.

With his play, Moliere’s aim was to target the incompetence of the medical profession. Bell’s contemporisation  lampoons a pill popping society and the influence of the pharmaceutical industry who are in cohorts with doctors to over prescribe medications. Continue reading THE HYPOCHONDRIAC @ THE ETERNITY PLAYHOUSE

RUBY’S WISH – INTERVIEW WITH CO CREATOR AND STAR ADRIANO CAPPELLETTA

RUBY’S WISH tells the beguiling story of Ruby, a little girl who believes in wishes, but not fairytales. Having spent most of her childhood in a hospital bed, Ruby has grown up far too fast, but when a tongue-tied clown doctor visits she will find a way to use her greatest gift – her imagination. Continue reading RUBY’S WISH – INTERVIEW WITH CO CREATOR AND STAR ADRIANO CAPPELLETTA

Avenue Q @ The Enmore Theatre

Queues deserve to run the length of Enmore Road for the current production of AVENUE Q.

Quite simply an incredibly entertaining musical theatre event, AVENUE Q is an R rated take on the G rated Sesame Street scenario, where the Muppets are more into kink than cookies, political correctness gets a reality check, and the songs are unabashedly bold.

Quick off the mark from the get go, the energy never lets up as recent university grad, Princeton, looks for lodging in Avenue Q, a low rent address whose superintendent is former child star, Gary Coleman. Continue reading Avenue Q @ The Enmore Theatre

Deathtrap @ Eternity Playhouse

photos by helen white
Production photos by Helen White

Devilishly dramatic and fiendishly funny, DEATHTRAP is a sure fire entertainment for those who like their fireside thrillers.

Written in the late Seventies by Ira Levin who should be quite apt at matters diabolical, being the author of Rosemary’s Baby, Darlinghurst Theatre Company’s production sets the situation in that era which gives it a cosy nostalgia, being the time of typewriters, carbon paper and Xerox machines.

DEATHTRAP is a play within a play and plays fast and close with the conventions of the mystery whodunit associated most immediately with Agatha Christie.

The very title alludes somewhat to the long running phenomenon that is The Mousetrap, although DEATHTRAP is a much more sophisticated example of the genre more akin to Anthony Schaffer’s Sleuth, which gets a mention, once or twice, in self-referential drollery.

This production headlines Andrew McFarlane as the playwright, Sidney Bruhl, a celebrated scribe on the brink of bankruptcy, both material and intellectual.

As a master of the mystery play, he is confronted by upstart new kid on the theatrical  blockbuster block, Clifford Anderson, played with dash by Timothy Dashwood, and the double temptation of perfect plagiarism facilitated by the perfect murder become palpable.

This applecart of chicanery is capsized by a clairvoyant from the land of clogs, a deliciously comedic turn from Georgina Symes.

Giving sensational support to this brio trio, is Sophie Gregg as Sidney’s slighted spouse and Drew Fairley as Sidney’s slippery solicitor.

Michael Hankin’s set is a triumph of Seventies chic, a stone den with flued fireplace and a trophy wall, a veritable arsenal of antique armaments.

Verity Hampson’s lighting design is adept and Katren Wood’s costume design nails the tans, beiges, and tawnies of the time.

Composer and sound designer Marty Jamieson totals the timbre and timing of the piece and the whole comic carnage caper is capped by Jo Turner’s cantering to a gallop direction.

Sharp shocks, twists and turns, GBH and ESP – this DEATHTRAP is worth getting caught in.

DEATHTRAP is  playing the Eternity Playhouse, 39 Burton Street, Darlinghurst until the 10th May. Performance times Tuesdays to Saturdays at 8pm and Sundays at 5pm.