Tag Archives: James Jonathon

Altar Boyz @ The Sutherland Memorial School Of Arts

Altar Boys-inset

Miranda Musical Society’s new production is a very good revival of the show ALTAR BOYZ helmed by Osman Kabbara. ALTAR BOYZ premiered at the 47th Street Theatre in New York City in September 2004 and then went Off Broadway in March the following year. It has since become one of the longest running off-Broadway musicals of all time.

ALTAR BOYZ tells the story of five small-town boys – Matthew, Mark, Luke, Juan and Abraham – trying to save the world, one screaming fan at a time. The musical is presented in real time as the final concert of their national “Raise the Praise” tour. Continue reading Altar Boyz @ The Sutherland Memorial School Of Arts

WTC’s JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR

Jesus Christ sits down to his Last Supper. Pic Perfect Images Photography
Jesus Christ sits down to his Last Supper. Pic Perfect Images Photography

This is a dazzling, superb version of Lloyd Webber and Rice’s rock opera JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR that takes one’s breath away.

Willoughby Theatre Company‘s (WTC) revival, directed by Stig Bell is a contemporary reworking of the now classic 1970’s musical that burns , including contemporary choreography,slang and ironic allusions to modern day life that make it as fresh as if it was written yesterday .

In a strong ,powerful piece of theatre , Lloyd Webber and Rice take us through the last week of Jesus’ life and ministry,as based on the Gospels . This includes Palm Sunday ,the Last Supper and end with the events of Good Friday and Mary Magdalene sobbing over Jesus’ inert body.

The cast is excellent featuring magnificent leads and a large, terrific ensemble.  Continue reading WTC’s JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR

The Mystery Of Edwin Drood

James Jonathon and Jessica James Moody in THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD
James Jonathon and Jessica James Moody in THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD is a show-within-a-show unfolding among the company of “London’s Music Hall Royale” in 1895. This musical won the Tony Award for Best Musical and Bankstown Theatre Company’s production makes for a highly entertaining evening. The very talented cast, director and production crew ensures the audience is part of the action and enjoys this music hall melodrama.

The musical is loosely based on the unfinished novel of the same name by Charles Dickens who, as “The Chairman”, played with flare by Les Asmussen our Master of Ceremonies for the night, says  “Mr. Charles Dickens was full halfway through the creation of The Greatest Mystery Novel Of Our Time, when he committed the one ungenerous deed of his noble career: He Died, leaving behind not the slightest hint as to the outcome he had intended for his bizarre and uncompleted puzzle” Thus the audience is left to select the murderer from a range of suspects.

Rupert Holmes, who wrote book, music and lyrics, does not focus on the murder of Drood but rather on the antics of the characters that make up the musical hall troupe. The story is set in “Cloisterham” and deals with John Jasper, a Jekyll-and-Hyde choirmaster played with full gusto by Stephen Halstead, who is madly in love with his music student, the beautiful Miss Rosa Bud, acted & beautifully sung by Rebecca Carter. Miss Bud is, in turn, engaged to Jasper’s nephew, young Edwin Drood, portrayed by a very polished Courtney Glass. Drood disappears mysteriously one stormy Christmas Eve – but has he actually been murdered or…?

We’re into Act Two, the story is in choas, and the characters begin lobbying the audience for solutions to their problems. Was it the wicked choirmaster, Drood’s uncle? Or could it have been Helena or Neville Landless (Jessica James Moody and James Jonathon), the Ceylon born twins who both have their reasons for wanting Drood out of the way? Or perhaps the very Reverend Crisparkle (Simon Fry) who hides dark secrets or the comic drunken Durdles (Ben Dodd) or Bazzard (Robert Taylor) … or maybe the mysterious Princess Puffer (Victoria Wildie), almost everyone is a possible suspect! Deputy (Greg Thornton) and Mr James Throttle (Vince Cairncross) add to the strange assortment of characters in the mystery.

The director Christopher Hamilton ensures the action moves along in ordered madness. Musical direction by Jayne Hamilton supports the singers with two piano accompanists (herself and Greg Crease) which form the orchestra. A clever and effective use of a series of paintings directed onto a large background screen place the audience in different locations. The musical hall set and detailed costumes further enhance this Victorian atmosphere.

A fun night is had by all with different outcomes each night depending on the audience vote.

The final performance of THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD is this afternoon at 4pm at the Bankstown Arts Centre, 5 Olympic Parade, Bankstown.

ASSASSINS

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Held up at glorious gunpoint between Miranda Musical Society’s previous show OKLAHOMA and the upcoming ANNIE comes a successful revival of Stephen Sondheim’s ASSASSINS. This show is a cavalcade of would-be killers and successful assassins from several eras of history. They taunt and help each other from an impossibly simultaneous present when the opening number sends them off in a carnival game to kill with guns of various descriptions.

As the eight assassins interact and react to their failed American Dreams they reveal a myriad of personal sensitivities, disorders, obsessions and excuses. All believe their only solution is to kill a president. This production’s faithful depiction of the show contains much humour as well as accuracy of accent and cultural predicament.

Continue reading ASSASSINS

OKLAHOMA

Rebecca Carter as Laurey and Eden Plaisted as Curly. Pic www.francisfotography.com.au

This production of OKLAHOMA is as up to date as Kansas City! Amidst acres of well-costumed colour, huge hoedown numbers and dream sequences, clever direction from James Worner also emphasizes the serious and sombre contrasts within this work.

On top of much comedy, lyricism and ambition relating to romance and gender roles, OKLAHOMA also covers the concept of the isolation of an outcast turned desperado. This extra layer fringing the top of all else is clearly presented by Miranda Musical Society.

Dark smokehouse scenes with a broodingly expressive Jud Fry are achieved in the using the reverse side of the Act One farmhouse set. This farm hand, often openly labelled as rough and different, has an out of control yearning for a wife and a place in the environment. The complex role is played with exquisite intensity by James Jonathon.

Continue reading OKLAHOMA