Tag Archives: James Brown

MEA CULPA : NO-ONE IS IN CHARGE OF ME BUT ME

Some two years ago, French born Australian multi-disciplinary artist/choreographer, Cloé Fournier, teamed-up with dramaturg Peter Maple, and created the fierce, fiery crucible that would one day eventually forge a theatrical dance performance hot enough to melt the preconceived truths of accepted wisdom.

Inspired and pushed to break new boundaries by a new mentor/dramaturg, Vicki Van Hout (an Indigenous recipient of the Australia Council Dance Award and with a life-time of resplendent achievements) Cloé Fournier recently assembled a company of brave, brazenly talented women dancers and her long-gestating dance creation, MEA CULPA exploded onto the stage. Continue reading MEA CULPA : NO-ONE IS IN CHARGE OF ME BUT ME

FORM DANCE PROJECTS TO PRESENT ‘MEA CULPA’ : A GUTSY NEW DANCE WORK

FORM Dance Projects will present MEA CULPA, a gutsy new dance theatre work from French-Australian multi-disciplinary artist Cloé Fournier at Riverside Theatres on October 18th and 19th

Featuring intriguing movement and spoken word, MEA CULPA depicts the dramas played out amongst seven female bodies, in a futuristic society, who bear the pressures from an ever-present invisible power, referred to as “IT”, which keeps them in submission. 

MEA CULPA takes the viewer on an absorbing and sensuous journey, where women stomp their feet and hiss in quest of salvation, freedom and self-liberation.  Continue reading FORM DANCE PROJECTS TO PRESENT ‘MEA CULPA’ : A GUTSY NEW DANCE WORK

TOM STOPPARD’S ‘THE REAL THING’ @ THE DRAMA THEATRE

The   subject of British playwright Tom Stoppard’s THE REAL THING  is love and the difficult terrain of the human heart.  Written in 1982 it was a  change in style for Stoppard who usually wrote very cerebral works .

In THE REAL THING Henry is married to Charlotte, whilst Annie is married to Max. But its Henry and Annie who have fallen passionately in . love. For Henry the main character, the question is has  Henry found love, is it the real thing?!

There’s also a sub plot which involves Annie who has taken up the cause of  Brodie an imprisoned Scottish soldier who has written a script which she wants to produce. Henry doesn’t offer any help , He thinks it is shite!  Continue reading TOM STOPPARD’S ‘THE REAL THING’ @ THE DRAMA THEATRE

MOSQUITOES @ THE DRAMA THEATRE

In British playwright Lucy Kirkwood’s MOSQUITOES Alice is a scientist working towards an important new discovery. Jenny  is her sister, and believes any conspiracy she reads on the internet. They couldn’t be more different. So, when tragedy forces them together, the impact has unexpected consequences.

It’s 2008 and Alice’s team of physicists at the Large Hadron Collider are searching for the Higgs Boson, stitching together the fabric of the cosmos. But at home, Alice’s family is falling apart at the seams. ‘It’s a story of facts and feelings, of resilience and decay, of particle physics and sibling rivalry, that reaches to the edges of time and space without ever losing touch with its very human heart’.

This was a compelling night in the theatre,  ‘a perfectly focused family drama woven together with big questions about the universe and our very existence’.                     Continue reading MOSQUITOES @ THE DRAMA THEATRE

AN INTERVIEW WITH HEAD OF CIRCUS STUDIES AT NICA

The National Institute of Circus Arts (NICA), is undertaking a nationwide audition roadshow in search of Australia’s future circus stars. Head of Circus Studies, James Brown with Vocational Education Coordinator Tegan Carmichael leads the audition search and we had the chance to talk to James before he set off on the national search for the next generation of circus artists.

SAG:  Where are you headed with this roadshow?

JAMES:  Most major cities, we like to hunt out the best talent that we can train with. So Sydney Adelaide, Perth and here in Melbourne where we had a pre-audition workshop. We held that last month and it’s a great opportunity to people who were not that familiar with the audition process.  We took them through what to expect on the day and an insight into what they need to prepare for, both physically and artistically. Continue reading AN INTERVIEW WITH HEAD OF CIRCUS STUDIES AT NICA

EMPIRE: TERROR ON THE HIGH SEAS

Ella Scott Lynch as Nicole and Anthony Gooley as Hertz-Hollingsworth. Pic Zak Kaczmarek
Ella Scott Lynch as Nicole and Anthony Gooley plays Mr Frey
in Toby Schmitz’s new play. Pic Zak Kaczmarek

Award winning playwright Toby Schmitz has joined forces with director Leland Kean to present his latest play EMPIRE: TERROR ON THE HIGH SEAS for the Tamarama Rock Surfers Theatre Company.

Schmitz and Kean set themselves the challenge of writing a post –colonial play that wasn’t set in Australia.  The story is set in 1925 aboard a luxury ocean liner, the Empress of Australia, on its way to New York.  We find a colourful array of characters from Britain’s once great Empire; the vicar – Reverend Daglish, Mr Frey – a misplaced Australian Dadaist, an Australian Anzac, bombastic South African fighter pilot Tony Hertz-Hollingsworth and his flamboyant wife Nicole, the charming ex Eton/Cambridge man of leisure – Dick Cavendish, French couple Dr and Madame Foveaux, Chicago bag-man – Bang Reiby and cabaret singer Poppy Mitchell, amongst others.

It soon becomes clear that there is a serial killer on board and Inspector Archie Daniels suspects that the culprit is from the eccentric first class of the ship.  We are aware by the second act of who the killer is and the murders become more and more macabre.  There are some very clever scenes, including the cabaret songs by Poppy, sung beautifully by Billie Rose Prichard and the private cabin party, played with great exuberance by Ella Scott Lynch as party girl Nicole.   Also invigorating is the wit and wisdom of Cavendish, played with great humour by Nathan Lovejoy.  Anthony Gee as Mr Hertz-Hollingsworth was funny, but a little out of place with his aggressive and somewhat inconsistent South African accent.

The cast are all competent actors who seem to be struggling to make this cabaret farce into a drama.  There is a lack of communication between characters, to the point where there is little sympathy when they are murdered.

The idea behind the play is great and the characters imaginative, but the dialogue is over intellectual at times and lacking in depth in terms of relationships.  Perhaps Schmitz has taken on too complex a story to be credible on stage.  There is great potential and brilliant humour and nuance nevertheless.  If the characters connected more, the audience could be more involved on an emotional level.  Kean has, however, brought out some fantastic characterisations amongst this strong cast of actors.

The production is very slick.  The set design by James Browne is very 1920s and has that shipboard transitional appeal.  The lighting and sound design by Luiz Pampolha and Jed Silver are extremely atmospheric and the costumes superb.

EMPIRE: TERROR ON THE HIGH SEAS plays the Bondi Pavilion from August 28 and September 28, 2013.