Tag Archives: Helen Dallimore

THE FANTASTICKS @ HAYES THEATRE

Jonathan Hickey and Martin Crewes in The Fantasticks. Production photos by (c) Marnya Rothe
Jonathan Hickey and Martin Crewes in The Fantasticks. Production photos by (c) Marnya Rothe

The original off-Broadway production of THE FANTASTICKS premiered in 1960, and ran a total of 42 years and 17,162 performances, making it the world’s longest-running musical theatre production, and has music by Harvey Schmidt with book and lyrics by Tom Jones.

Wooden Horse Productions Theatre  Company has brought this mercurial musical to the Hayes Theatre in a production directed by Helen Dallimore, with co-musical direction by Hayden Barltrop and Glenn Moorhouse.

This production features a compact live orchestra- just two musicians- guitar and electronic keyboard. Continue reading THE FANTASTICKS @ HAYES THEATRE

THE FANTASTICKS COMING TO THE HAYES

Bobbie-Jean Henning in THE FANTASTICKS. Pic by Marnya Rothe.
Bobbie-Jean Henning in THE FANTASTICKS. Pic by Marnya Rothe.

What is the world’s longest-running musical theatre production? Cats? The Phantom of the Opera? Chicago? The Lion King? No, it’s a boutique musical with a poetic book and a breezy, inventive score which has been performed all around the globe – THE FANTASTICKS. The show’s original off-Broadway production ran a total of 42 years and 17,162 performances, making it the world’s longest-running musical.

Whimsical, poignant and romantic, THE FANTASTICKS focuses on two young lovers, their meddling fathers, and the journey we all must take through adolescent thrills, the growing pains of hurt and betrayal, the highs of passion, the challenges of distance and the agonies of heartbreak to discover how to truly love. Continue reading THE FANTASTICKS COMING TO THE HAYES

Blood Brothers @ The Hayes

Helen Dallimore as Mrs Johnstone
Helen Dallimore as Mrs Johnstone in the current revival of BLOOD BROTHERS

It’s doubtful that you will be able to score a ticket to BLOOD BROTHERS playing at the Hayes Theatre at the moment. Why? Because Sydney theatregoers recognize a good thing when they see it … and see it … and see it. I’ve gone twice and so have my friends. Some have managed to scrounge a third ticket from somewhere. What’s so good about this production? Nothing in particular. Just … the cast, the music, the band, the lighting, the audio mixing, the set, the costumes and the rousing applause of a thoroughly satisfied audience.

Mrs Johnstone (to be) is taken dancing by a fancy man whose chat line includes how much she looks like Marilyn Monroe. Marriage and children ensue and the dancing dwindles until Mr Johnstone scarpers with another Marilyn lookalike while his missus is up the duff with twins. Manipulated by the childless Mrs Lyons into handing over one of the twins and swearing on a bible to keep the bargain, Mrs Johnstone’s supposed to see the child every day as she chars for the Lyons. Until she gets the unceremonious boot and a few grotty Pound notes! Continue reading Blood Brothers @ The Hayes

MASQUERADE @ the Drama Theatre

“Fifty is my first, Nothing is my second, Five just makes my third, My fourth a vowel is reckoned.”

Bring your children to Sydney Opera House to see this world  premiere production delivered in a manner that is well beyond the world of the armchair treasure hunt, with its beautiful illustrations, provided by the book.

Local playwright Kate Mulvany has lovingly adapted British author Kit Williams’ children’s book, first published in January, 1987.

Jack Hare takes us all on a fast-paced 120 minute journey, departing from his mistress, The Moon and then setting out on a mission to deliver both her message of love (a deep and meaningful riddle) and her jeweled gift, to her male paramour, The Sun. Continue reading MASQUERADE @ the Drama Theatre

Daylight Saving

Helen Dallimore, Ian Stenlake, Belinda Giblin, Christ Stollery, Rachel Gordon (c) Helen White
Helen Dallimore, Ian Stenlake, Belinda Giblin, Christ Stollery, Rachel Gordon (c) Helen White

The starting point to Nick  Enright’s DAYLIGHT SAVING is unexceptional. A forties something North Shore married couple, Tom and Felicity, are struggling to find time together. Tom, a high profile sports agent, is always travelling overseas to cater to the whims of his clients. He is about to head off again and  Felicity- nicknamed Flick- chides him, once more, with feeling.

Enright packs in  plenty of  ‘red herrings’, interesting plot lines, farcical situations, quirky characters and zingy one liners to keep audiences well entertained to a very neat finishing line.

This latest  revival of one of Enright’s most  popular works, first performed at Kirribilli’s Ensemble theatre in 1989, is given a  warm, polished, vibrant production by Adam Cook who was a close friend of the late, master Australian playwright. Continue reading Daylight Saving

Tartuffe

Leon Ford as Tartuffe tries to to seduce Orgon's wife Elmire, played by Helen Dallimore. Pic Lisa Tomasetti
Leon Ford as Tartuffe tries to to seduce Orgon’s wife Elmire, played by Helen Dallimore. Pic Lisa Tomasetti

In a witty, fresh translation – yes in rhyming couplets – by Justin Fleming, Bell Shakespeare brings us a wickedly delightful new version of Moliere’s TARTUFFE. It has been updated to Sydney now, with Australian slang and accents and works wonderfully. Fleming’s translation remains faithful to Moliere’s text while rearranging the 12-syllable lines of rhyming couplets to suit the English language. The younger audience especially loved it and were in stitches.

The play is still extremely relevant to today. Above all it examines the fake hype and religious fervour, the search for religious meaning in late middle age, that the pious swindler Tartuffe shams, Rasputin like, – a veritable Napoleon of a TV evangelist con man. Continue reading Tartuffe

CRUISE CONTROL

Peter-Phelps-Michelle-Doake-Helen-Dallimore-Henri-Szeps-Felix-Williamson-and-Kate-Fitzpatrick-in-CRUISE-CONTROL
The cast (left to right): Peter Phelps, Michelle Doake, Helen Dallimore, Henri Szeps,-Felix Williamson and Kate Fitzpatrick in CRUISE CONTROL Pic Clare Hawley

David Williamson has gone for clever comedy, with a touch of the macabre, for his latest play, CRUISE CONTROL. Australia’s premiere playwright draws on a cauldron style scenario: Throw a group of very different people together, have it so that they can’t get away from each other, and then see how things play out.

The hothouse environment is on the cruise ship, Queen Mary 11, which is doing a seven night crossing from London to New York. Three very different couples come together each night in the main dining room and become increasingly entangled with each other. There are plenty of surprises in store for audiences with an intricately woven plot.

Continue reading CRUISE CONTROL