Tag Archives: Graeme McRae

STALKING THE BOGEYMAN – A WITNESS STEALTHILY CRAFTED

STALKING THE BOGEYMAN – Production images by John Marmaras

STALKING THE BOGEYMAN is certainly a play of stealth. It sneaks up on you, more shock than awe, to insinuate itself in a creepy, thought provoking, emotionally exhausting way that had my friends arguing loudly over our after-matinee dinner.  Would you or wouldn’t you, did you believe him, all sorts of questions flying.  Helmed by a terrific performance, this show is a conception which will furtively stalk you for days after. Continue reading STALKING THE BOGEYMAN – A WITNESS STEALTHILY CRAFTED

SPORT FOR JOVE PRESENTS ‘THE THREE SISTERS’ @ REGINALD THEATRE SEYMOUR CENTRE

Sport For Jove (3)

Production photography by Marnya Rothe.

While long, this is a tremendous production, more faithful to Chekhov in spirit than recent revivals seen in Sydney. The play features a new translation by Karen Vickery that makes the play seem fresh and relevant. One picks up the plays’ similarities to other Chekhov works in particular The Cherry Orchard.

Director Kevin Jackson and his wonderful cast have caught the Russian melancholy and ennui perfectly. The production is magnificently performed. There is a huge cast  -fourteen of the cast in credited roles and six others as servants/military /singers.- all of whom give fine, inspired performances.

With wonderful designs by Georgia Hopkins the first act sees a cluttered, crowded set of tables overflowing with books, well used worn chairs, rugs, a piano, a niche with an icon all evoking provincial Russia circa 1900. When we move into the second half, and the characters become increasingly unhappy with their lives, the stage space as defined by the rugs is halved; indicating that the action takes place in the smaller, upstairs parlour, and also reflectively surrounding the actors with empty, black space (and ominous fire-lit warmth ). For the final scenes, the carpets are rolled up and the furniture hidden under dust sheets, replaced with white wicker garden furniture, and lush green pot plants, which signify indicate the new beginnings planned. Emma Vine’s costumes are superb as is Martin Kinnane’s lighting design. Continue reading SPORT FOR JOVE PRESENTS ‘THE THREE SISTERS’ @ REGINALD THEATRE SEYMOUR CENTRE

ON THE SHORE OF THE WIDE WORLD

Huw Higginson and Amanda Stephens-Lee in ON THE SHORE OF THE WIDE WORLD. PIc Rebecca Martin
Huw Higginson and Amanda Stephens-Lee in ON THE SHORE OF THE WIDE WORLD.
PIc Rebecca Martin

There’s a billboard for another show in Sydney that has the quote “if only every night in the theatre could be as good”. It’s a quote worth purloining for the Pantsguys Griffin Independent production of Simon Stephens’ ON THE SHORE OF THE WIDE WORLD.

Winner of the Olivier Award for Best New Play in 2005, the decade long wait for the play to reach our shores has been worth it with a finely hewn, polished production that befits the finely hewn, polished writing.

A family saga set in Stockport strewn over a 9 month period, it spills and sprawls over three generations of the Holmes family, grandparents Charlie and Ellen, parents Peter and Alice, and their sons, Alex and Christopher.

Synchronised like Sydney’s New Year’s Eve fireworks, the pyrotechnic display starts with firecracker Christopher, the youngest of the family exploding with adolescent exuberance over the imminent sleepover of older brother Alex’s new girlfriend, Sarah, sanctioned by the boys’ parents whose only proviso is that they “be careful”.

Christopher is sex obsessed hoping to catch sounds of squeaky springs or any other noises of his sibling’s sexual encounter. On meeting Sarah, he becomes infatuated with her, borrowing a fiver from his grand-dad to buy her a present. Continue reading ON THE SHORE OF THE WIDE WORLD