Tag Archives: emma palmer

THE HOLLOW CROWN: A MAGNIFICENT PRODUCTION FROM SPORT FOR JOVE

This image: Eloise Winstock by Seiya Taguchi 
Featured image: Bron Lim & ensemble by Seiya Taguchi

To the curmudgeon who pontificated loudly, even during the show, that it wasn’t working.  I don’t know you, even though we have been engaged in the closeness of watching theatre together.  So I can’t take you for a drink to let you know that you are just plain wrong and need to take your elitist, out of touch, resistant attitude and just sod off.  Me, and I could hear and see, the other 150 plus audience just loved THE HOLLOW CROWN, first in the two part ROSE RIOT season from Sport for Jove.

Playing at Bella Vista Farm, ROSE RIOT is two golden productions which are forged with vision, experience and coherent expression by a company who make bold choices, assemble extraordinary talent and encircle their audiences with enthralling beauty.  There’s a reason why Shakespeare lends his name to an adjective.  Reverence and relevance and the adventure of seeing the darknesses of great wrongs and the shiningness of majestic rights, all before our eyes with real voices, the musicality of poetry and a physicality that delights and engages.  And ideas, always the ideas.  Continue reading THE HOLLOW CROWN: A MAGNIFICENT PRODUCTION FROM SPORT FOR JOVE

DIANE SAMUELS’ ‘KINDERTRANSPORT’ @ THE ETERNITY PLAYHOUSE

Production photography by Phillip Erbacher.

‘To really get to know a person you have got to get inside a person’s skin and walk around a while.’ Atticus Finch in Harper Lee’s ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’.

This famous quote holds as true as ever.  We need to step outside of ourselves and into the ‘shoes’ of another human being to truly understand and accept them.

This is what British playwright Diane Samuels does with her play which explores what it was like to be a Kindertransport survivor. These were the Jewish children who the British Government rescued from the clutches of Nazism. Between the end of 1938 and the end of 1939 the British Government issued 10,000 permits  to get children out, minus their parents, and provide them with safe passage to England, where they were taken in by foster parents who were ‘charged with’ trying to bring order and stability back into their lives.

The play follows the journey of Eva from the time she leaves Germany for England to her own middle-age as a long established British resident with an inquisitive grown-up daughter who is demanding to know more about her long ago past., Samuels’ play also includes a non-naturalistic, symbolic level with the use of extracts from an an eerie children’s story, ‘The Rat Catcher’.

I found the  play authentic, and well served by Sandra Eldridge’s fine production. Sarah Greenwood as young Eva and Camilla Ah Kin as the adult Eva took us deeply into her world. Continue reading DIANE SAMUELS’ ‘KINDERTRANSPORT’ @ THE ETERNITY PLAYHOUSE

RIDE AND FOURPLAY @ ETERNITY PLAYHOUSE

Second pic- Ride
Tom O’Sullivan and Emma Palmer in Jane Bodie’s RIDE, part of a Bodie double bill at the Eternity Playhouse. Production photography by Robert Catto

RIDE & FOURPLAY is a two play presentation of a couple of early works by Jane Bodie, a dynamic double feature directed by Anthony Skuse.

A little like Terrence McNally’s Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, RIDE begins with a naked man and a naked woman in a crumpled bed.

It transpires that they have no recollection of how they ended up back in his bed, whether or not they have had sex, or where her bra and one shoe have disappeared to. Continue reading RIDE AND FOURPLAY @ ETERNITY PLAYHOUSE

Constellations

 

Sam O'Sullivan and Emma Palmer in Constellations. Pic Gez Xavier Mansfield
Sam O’Sullivan and Emma Palmer in Constellations. Pic Gez Xavier Mansfield

Reverence My Sanctuary is inscribed in the proscenium arch of the stage. It is not purpose built as the play’s set but a remnant of the old Baptist Tabernacle Church that now hosts the Eternity Playhouse, an apt space to perform CONSTELLATIONS, Nick Payne’s play about multiple possible universes.

Director Anthony Skuse, captivated by the building’s interior structure, “notions of time, mortality and faith are inscribed in the building’s markings and scars”, with his production designer Gez Xavier Mansfield, has brilliantly placed the action of the piece in a sort of palimpsest, utilising extant structure- the dome curvature of the back wall suggests a celestial observatory – and inscriptions while introducing an oblique plinth and a couple of chairs placed askew to cue the off kilter, non-linear form of the play. Continue reading Constellations