Tag Archives: David Hooley

Beyond Therapy @ King Street

Rebecca Scott as Prudence and David Hooley as Bruce in BEYOND THERAPY
Rebecca Scott as Prudence and David Hooley as Bruce in BEYOND THERAPY

Originally produced in 1981, Christopher Durang’s BEYOND THERAPY is a classic of its time and has had some spectacular names associated over time. Sigourney Weaver, Diane Wiest , John Lithgow to name just three. Robert Altman even made a film loosely based on it.

Johann Walraven, director of the current production at King Street Theatre views the text with a modern eye. His director’s notes speak of a “mid thirties” guy who sees his peer group change and wonders what choice is right for him. That generation was certainly well represented in the audience the night I saw the show. I was often alone in laughing out loud in response to the text and its 80’s references.

Bruce (David Hooley) is feeling the lack of marriage and children in his life, this despite having a male live-in-lover, Bob (Jasper Whincop). Abetted by his meddling and inept therapist, Charlotte (Nadia Townsend) he is placing ads in the newspaper’s lonely hearts column. Twice, he attracts Prudence (Rebecca Scott) who has been egged on by her therapist, Stuart (Andrew Johnson). After at first hating each other, the pair grow into a nervous relationship.

While Bruce has Bob to deal with, Prudence has her hands full with Stuart. She has had sex with him in the past and he is very keen to repeat the experience despite her mention of deregistration and his premature ejaculation issue. Bruce takes Charlotte’s advice as gospel despite the fact that she has some kind of nominal aphasia and a Snoopy toy to support her who barks when a patient makes her happy. And poor Bob is not going without making a splash! Continue reading Beyond Therapy @ King Street

PRIVATES ON PARADE

Written in 1977, this “play with music” appeared just two years before the inaugural Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras parade. It contains some of the earliest progressive depictions of same sex relationships, and is an excellent choice for the New Theatre to present it in conjunction with the Mardi Gras festival this year.

The work comes from a time before political correctness, and includes many references to ethnicity, gender and sexual preference that could make contemporary audiences cringe, but director Alice Livingstone is mindful of the change in context and deals with those awkward moments shrewdly and with sensitivity.

Continue reading PRIVATES ON PARADE