Tag Archives: Brandon McClelland

A Town Named War Boy @ The Metcalfe Auditorium, The State Library

A Town Named War Boy 2 - Inset image by Tracey Schramm
Production pics by Tracey Schramm

Australian playwright Ross Mueller has crafted this play-on commission- after going through the State Library’s very significant collection of First World War diaries, photographs  and letters. That is one helluva a brief!

The  approach that Mueller has taken is to structure his piece as a four-hander. We follow the lives of four young men from their enlistment in Sydney to the long boat ride that takes them to Cairo, from where they are then thrown into the war zone, into a town named war boy. Continue reading A Town Named War Boy @ The Metcalfe Auditorium, The State Library

Suddenly Last Summer @ The Drama Theatre

SuddenlyLastSummer-second
Inset Pic- Eryn Jean Norvill as Catharine. Featured Pic- Susan Prior as Mrs Holly, Paula Arundell as Sister Felicity, Eryn Jean Norvill as Catharine, Robyn Nevin as Mrs Venable and Mark Leonard Winter as Doctor in Tennessee Williams’ SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER

This current Sydney Theatre Company show at the Opera House has that wow factor.

Kip Williams stunning production of Tennessee Williams brilliant play is a must see.

Within  a few minutes of the play starting we are completely immersed in Williams’  disturbing, hypnotic world.

The play’s title refers to the death the summer previous of Sebastian Venable. Whilst we never get to meet Sebastian on stage, the play is all about charting Sebastian’s journey, telling his story, and the terrible circumstances surrounding his  death.  Continue reading Suddenly Last Summer @ The Drama Theatre

M.ROCK

Valerie Bader as Mabel and Clementine Mills as Tracey in M. ROCK. Pic LIsa Tomasetti
Valerie Bader as Mabel and Clementine Mills as Tracey in M. ROCK. Pic LIsa Tomasetti

Is the divide that has always existed between the generations growing greater and greater as advancements in technology make further and further inroads into our lives?

I think that it would be fair to say that popular opinion would very much answer this question in the affirmative.

One of Australia’s finest young playwrights, Lachlan Philpott, throws a different, brighter light on this whole issue with his new play, M.ROCK. The play’s romantic notion is that the universal love of music has the power to bridge the gap between the generations.

Continue reading M.ROCK