Tag Archives: Ben Pierpoint

OMAR AND DAWN @ THE KINGS X THEATRE

80 year-old Dawn, (Maggie Blinco), is a remarkable woman, the kind who should be awarded an OA for her services to the homeless and destitute.  She volunteers at St Vincents Hospital by day and shelters and fosters destitute teenagers by night. She gradually convinces the reluctant Omar, (Antony Makhlouf), a street boy alienated by his Lebanese family for being gay, to be placed with her and learn some practical, life-affirming skills from Dawn’s mechanic brother, Darren, (Lex Marinos), who works from a garage at their house.

Omar is hard work, but Maggie is persistent..and tough.  She temporarily holds back her house keys from Omar, who is fond of swearing and far from respectful, and imposes a curfew on him.  Darren is not happy with his sister’s domestic arrangements and, although there is love between them, he keeps suggesting she move into a retirement home.  Of course she refuses and we find out later that Darren has other motives. Continue reading OMAR AND DAWN @ THE KINGS X THEATRE

BLACK BIRDS : PERFORMANCE ART WITH PLENTY TO SAY

BLACK BIRDS is a gutsy, entertaining performance piece about race, skin colour and hair, devised and performed by Emele Ugavule and Ayeesha Ash. The work blends music, movement, spoken word and stories from real life.

Ugavule and Ash share their stories of how they were ostracised & bullied as children and feared, shunned, mistreated and misunderstood as they moved into adulthood. Some of the worst treatment they experienced was from people who thought they were being liberal and inclusive but were, in fact, still focusing on these women’s difference and were not interacting with them as individuals. Continue reading BLACK BIRDS : PERFORMANCE ART WITH PLENTY TO SAY

WE, THE LOST COMPANY @ THE OLD 505 THEATRE

we-the-lost-company-body-final

It’s the raw redness of it. The pain when it stretches. The spasms and contractions in the slow twisting to find an elusive comfort. The joy during the hours of creation long gone, the sunburned characters who populate beside, around, in and under the water in WE, THE LOST COMPANY paroxysm in front of us. The water soothes them and the echoes of water, the spit of a splash or the contemplative music of a lap pulls the unbidden memory from an audience transported in the observation of beauty.

Inspired initially by the canvases of Brett Whiteley’s beach series in which the human figures range from sand ridden to sun reaching, this work from the Clockfire Theatre collective delves into the human relationship with water. The work also draws on Whiteley’s admiration for Yukio Mishima who is more remembered in the West for his ceremonial seppuku death than his work. The Japanese connection is further explored with references to the 2000 year old tradition of the Ama Pearl Divers. Continue reading WE, THE LOST COMPANY @ THE OLD 505 THEATRE