Tag Archives: Alistair Wallace

SPORT FOR JOVE PRESENTS ‘NO END OF BLAME’ @ THE SEYMOUR CENTRE

All art is dangerous and to be an artist can cost you your sanity and your life. Is art meant to serve society, or is it a vehicle to serve the arrogance of the artist? Or, can it be either or both?!

This intense, explosive production by Sport For Jove,  luminously directed by Damien Ryan, is disturbing and powerful yet also at times lyrical and poetic.

In some ways the plays feels like a cross between a play by Tom Stoppard and Vaclav Havel , sharp and witty , wordy with piercing use of language.

First published in 1981 , in thirteen scenes over two acts , NO END OF BLAME roams over six decades of the 20th Century , from 1918 to the mid 1970’s , across various locations in Europe, and the play pits a passionate, provocative pair of artists, one a painter, Igor, the other a cartoonist, Bela ,against the forces of censorship and insidious state control that corrupt and stifle the human right to freedom of thought and freedom of speech. Continue reading SPORT FOR JOVE PRESENTS ‘NO END OF BLAME’ @ THE SEYMOUR CENTRE

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? @ THE GREEK THEATRE

Plenty of shots are fired in the late, great Edward Albee’s classic drama, WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF. Middle-aged couple George and Mildred marriage is a war zone and they invite another couple, Nick and Honey, over to unwittingly join them on the front line.

This latest revival of this oft performed Albee work has been put on by the Theatron Group.

A good creative team comprising John Pryce-Jones’ raised platform set of George and Martha’s 1960’s living room, Martin Kinnane’s sharp lighting design, and Alistair Wallace’s subtle sound design create a very distinct world for what is a stellar cast to weave their spell in. This small troupe of players genuinely seize upon the ‘meaty’ roles which Albee has gifted them. Continue reading WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? @ THE GREEK THEATRE

Through These Lines

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As we lead into the 100th Anniversary of the ANZAC tradition, established in Gallipoli through the fierce bravery and camaraderie displayed by the Australian and New Zealand troops under the most appalling conditions, we welcome the opportunity to be reminded of the stories of these soldiers and their sacrifice. However, there were also Australian and New Zealand women who endured hardship and experienced great trauma during WW1, – the nurses. It is heartening to see their stories are being told as well, without gloss or glamour.

THROUGH THESE LINES writer and ensemble member, Cheryl Ward (she plays the fair but strict Matron Ada Watson) demonstrates extensive research and effective manipulation of techniques and emotions to bring to life the story of Sister Florence Whiting, (Kate Skinner). Continue reading Through These Lines

MR KOLPERT

left to right- Garth Holcombe, Claire Lovering, Paige Gardiner and Tim Reuben. Pic Gez Xavier Mansfield
left to right- Garth Holcombe, Claire Lovering, Paige Gardiner and Tim Reuben. Pic Gez Xavier Mansfield

David Gieselmann’s play, translated by David Tushingham and presented by Pantsguys, is absurdist black comedy at its best. It produces many laughs, numerous plot twists, some shocks and highlights some very unpleasant aspects of human behaviour.

A bored young couple, Sarah (Claire Lovering) and chaos researcher Ralf (Tim Reuben), invite Edith (Paige Gardiner) who works with Sarah and her architect husband Bastian (Garth Holcombe) for dinner and an evening of mind games and manipulation. They fail to provide dinner and order take away pizzas in one of the plays many clever comic moments.

Things take a dark turn when Sarah & Ralph claim they have killed their co-worker Mr Kolpert and put his body in a large trunk which features on the side of the stage. Did they really murder Mr Kolpert, or are they just carrying out a grim wind-up of their guests, especially Bastian, who comes to truly believe they are the callous murderers despite their urbane and witty chat?

Continue reading MR KOLPERT