Tag Archives: Alfred Schnittke

AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA : LUMINOUS @ CITY RECITAL HALL

The individual elements in this landmark production are tremendous but I found the performance dark , somewhat disturbing and perhaps a bit fragmented and disjointed ( which , I understand , is at least partly what the ACO intended ).

LUMINOUS is a haunting collaboration between the ACO and controversial photographer Bill Henson. It is a revival of this work , with brand new imagery, updated repertoire and guest vocals from indie Israeli-Australian singer-songwriter Lior.

Henson’s photos, often first seen in extremely close grainy close up , blur the boundaries between gender , adulthood and youth , night and day, rural and urban .There are extraordinary lonely graffitied landscapes with windy trees and the models in the Caravaggio – like images quite frequently appear world weary and bruised . The camera work , panning in extreme close up then pulling away to reveal the full photo creates totally different images at times, red dots revealed to be a leaf or hair for example, making this reviewer think of sunspots and other planets perhaps. Continue reading AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA : LUMINOUS @ CITY RECITAL HALL

AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA : BEETHOVEN’S FAVOURITE

Featured pic – Lorenza Borrani. Pic by Edwina Pickles.

Under the excellent direction of guest director and violinist Lorenza Borrani, who clearly had a great rapport with the Orchestra, we were treated to a superb performance by the ACO.

The SCHNITTKE Sonata for violin and chamber orchestra was a striking, most unusual work in four movements that made us sit up and prick our ears.

The opening was questioning, sharp, spiky and emphatic. The second Allegretto movement was dance-like in atmosphere. The orchestral ensemble was very focused and driven. There was a use of pizzicatto. Sometimes the music felt like the whirling and turning of the spheres. The third movement was emphatic with ominous deep double bass.  Borrani was amazing in her solos, fiery and hypnotic yet tender and liquid as well.

In the fourth movement, Anthony Romaniuk’s harpsichord entered the piece at crucial moments, and he also performed  a short dazzling solo. Continue reading AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA : BEETHOVEN’S FAVOURITE