Tag Archives: ALFRED DEAKIN IS AFRAID OF THE DARK

ALFRED DEAKIN IS AFRAID OF THE DARK: A LYRICAL NEW WORK

The Theatre on Chester won’t tell you, they are a pretty modest bunch, but that’s sort of my job when I see something to blow a trumpet for.    ALFRED DEAKIN IS AFRAID OF THE DARK is a home-grown play about a political figure who we should actually know about.  Their production of this nascent new work is gorgeously conceived, well-acted and directed by the writer of the piece with a strong sense of imagery and character.  It is a play that piques one’s curiosity and guides you off into google-land with a burning desire to know more about a man whose name we hear often but whose achievements and failures are buried in time.

And the play begins with his resurrection to grand trumpeting audio and a female séance pleading.  Alfred Deakin, with a Canberra suburb and a prestigious university named after him, is called from the grave.   The spiritualism of the Victorians is well known and Deakin had an interest in it long before he married ‘Pattie’ Brown, her father being a famed supporter of the practice.  In this fictitious incarnation of Deakin’s life, he will be surrounded by women.  Pattie gives him 3 daughters, his sister Katie is a strong influence in his life and he also meets with the first woman in the Empire to stand as a candidate, Vida Goldstein. Continue reading ALFRED DEAKIN IS AFRAID OF THE DARK: A LYRICAL NEW WORK