Tag Archives: Scott Witt

Bad @ The Old Fitz

Late night Clowning at the Old Fitzroy
Late night clowning at the Old Fitzroy

Take in your piss and let them take the piss. The Old Fitz under the new regime Red Line Productions have ushered in a late show program to follow their main stage offering, beginning with BAD, a delightful piece of clown drollery.

BAD is so good it’s funny.

The lights go down in the bible black, Spartan no-back seating of the space, and the public address welcomes us to this production starring Cate Blanchett and Geoffrey Rush.

In darkness visible, time passes, and the regrettable announcement that Geoffrey Rush will not be appearing this evening is made. From centre stage, a light, and a diminutive red nosed character in red shorts and silver cape, tights and boots introduces herself as Cate Blanchett. Her accent is kooky Francaise and the rest of her vocabulary is fluent gibberish. Continue reading Bad @ The Old Fitz

Monkey…Journey to the West

Second Image
Aljin Abella and Darren Gilshenan in Monkey…Journey to The West

Hands up those who remember the iconic incredibly popular TV series Monkey of the 1970’s ?

Theatre of Image under the brilliantly inspired direction of Kim Carpenter, in combination with legendary John Bell of Bell Shakespeare and in collaboration with Team 9Lives have fashioned a magnificent, enthralling, visually stunning production based on a story originally from the 1500’s that enchants.

For those unfamiliar with Monkey it could perhaps be compared to a Buddhist style ‘ The Wizard of OZ’ with our heroes on a mission to rescue three holy scriptures and return them to the people of China. The fable with its moral and visual symbolism lends itself splendidly to this multi layered production.
Continue reading Monkey…Journey to the West

Tartuffe

Leon Ford as Tartuffe tries to to seduce Orgon's wife Elmire, played by Helen Dallimore. Pic Lisa Tomasetti
Leon Ford as Tartuffe tries to to seduce Orgon’s wife Elmire, played by Helen Dallimore. Pic Lisa Tomasetti

In a witty, fresh translation – yes in rhyming couplets – by Justin Fleming, Bell Shakespeare brings us a wickedly delightful new version of Moliere’s TARTUFFE. It has been updated to Sydney now, with Australian slang and accents and works wonderfully. Fleming’s translation remains faithful to Moliere’s text while rearranging the 12-syllable lines of rhyming couplets to suit the English language. The younger audience especially loved it and were in stitches.

The play is still extremely relevant to today. Above all it examines the fake hype and religious fervour, the search for religious meaning in late middle age, that the pious swindler Tartuffe shams, Rasputin like, – a veritable Napoleon of a TV evangelist con man. Continue reading Tartuffe

ON/OFF

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When an actor and a singer come together to create a work in the cabaret space, it is a sure sign that they are on a mission to break theatrical rules in order to create something unique and fresh. ON/OFF certainly gives us something new and innovative, but more than that, this is a work that entertains, fascinates, and connects on many levels. It takes its audience on an emotional roller coaster ride, well aware that it is the contrast of funny and sad that makes each reaction more powerful. We laugh and cry, and laugh again. With its unusual structure and excellent performances, the show forces us to let down our guard, and takes control of all our sentiments.

Scott Witt’s direction is superb. He constantly plays with juxtapositions, making use of the wildly different characteristics of the two actors, and the spacial concepts of on stage and off stage, and crafts a work that is as emotionally volatile as it is confident in its structure and plot. The journey is incredibly bumpy, but the destination is crystal clear. The experience of witnessing one actor on stage, and the other off, while listening to a familiar cabaret standard, is a pleasure that has to be seen to be believed.

Marissa Dikkenberg’s depiction of her character’s disintegration is marvelous. Sara is a bland “Stepford housewife” type, who goes through a thorough and clamorous break down, progressing from a chirpy and sober state of delusion into a complete drunken mess. Dikkenberg has a strong singing voice, but uses her skills carefully to maintain the inevitability of her character. Lisa Chappell’s presence in the tiny Bordello Theatre is colossal, and her acting is faultless. Her drama and comedy are both high octane, but the gory authenticity she puts into her work makes every moment convincing. Chappell’s performance is determined to hit her audience like a ton of bricks. It is unabashed, unapologetic theatricality at its most flamboyant and audacious, and completely delicious.

This is alternative art, but formulated with the intention to communicate to wide audiences. It is a story about life’s disappointments, human resilience, and the value of friendship. These themes are universal, and also passionate. The words to one of the show’s songs sum things up best, “you’ve got to laugh a little, cry a little… and when the world is through with us, we’ve got each other’s arms.” Many things happen in On/Off, but what endures is The Glory Of Love.

Lisa Chappell’s show ON/OFF is running at the Bordello Theatre, Kings Cross until December 15.

Suzy Wrong’s review was originally published on her website covering the Sydney theatre scene, www.suzygoessee.com