Tag Archives: Kate Box

Dolores @ The Old Fitz

Kate Box and Janine Watson play troubled sisters Dolores and Sandra in Edward Allan Baker’s drama DOLORES. Production pics by Rupert Reid

The name Dolores means sorrows. It derives from the Spanish moniker for Virgin Mary of Sorrows.

The titular Dolores of Edward Allan Baker’s DOLORES is no virgin, but she certainly is a sorry so and so, a perpetual sucker to a string of abusive men, the latest of which has bloodied her face and blackened her eye and forced her to seek refuge at her sister Sandra’s place.

Growing up in a blue-collar family, both women are dependent on men and both are vulnerable. Dolores is the family fuck-up with a life strewn with abortions and reckless unrequited romances. Continue reading Dolores @ The Old Fitz

A Christmas Carol @ Belvoir

This is a very special Christmas Carol. Pics: Brett Boardman
This is a very special Christmas Carol. Pics: Brett Boardman

Merry is not quite the word for A CHRISTMAS CAROL playing during the Festive Season at Belvoir. The show is definitely Christmassy, definitely snowy, but it is the faithfulness to the original text which gives the show its dimension. Modernised in places and with Australian accents, the production retains the Dickensian darkness to give a depth of thought to stay with you after the flurry has melted away.

Ebenezer Scrooge (Robert Menzies) is hunched over a large ledger when the audience enters the space. Bob Cratchit (Steve Rodgers) is working faithfully beside him. After an uncomfortable visit from his nephew Fred (Eden Falk), Scrooge reluctantly closes up for the day and heads home to his bed as Bob joyfully heads home to his family. It is at 1 am, in bed, that Scrooge encounters the tortured ghost of his dead business partner, Marley (Peter Carroll).

Rest will not come easy to Scrooge on this Christmas Eve. He will be visited by Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Future. These apparitions bring him back to the love of humanity he knew as a small boy. In this way, will he avoid the fate of his dead partner? Continue reading A Christmas Carol @ Belvoir

THE LITTLE DEATH

Lisa McCune and Alan Duke on the set of the new Josh Lawson movie,  THE LITTLE DEATH
Lisa McCune and Alan Duke on the set of the new Josh Lawson movie, THE LITTLE DEATH

With his new film  THE LITTLE DEATH,  Josh Lawson has written and directed a very funny film. Various stories relating to the sex lives and fantasies of a group of friends and neighbours are hilariously examined.

The film opened at the Sydney Film Festival and the audience was laughing from the opening scene. It was difficult to hear all the dialogue during the phone sex scene (featuring Erin James and TJ Power) because of the waves of laughter resounding through the cinema.

THE LITTLE DEATH opens with a scene about rape fantasy; a topic that is fraught with danger and in the wrong hands could be destructive and traumatic. However, Josh Lawson handles the situation well with humour and sensibly avoids the potential hazards of this subject.

Other fantasies explored include:-  being aroused by someone crying and the tragic and comic depths someone will descend into to make their partner cry, being turned on by inherently funny role-play which happens to turn into an obsession, and being aroused by the sight of a sleeping partner. These fantasies make for some comical set pieces. Even though the film’s subject is about very intimate feelings and subjects, the characters tend to get themselves into complicated and ridiculous situations through their failure to have open and intimate conversations. This is incidental, really, as the film is lots of fun.

There are consistently strong performances from a talented cast that includes Josh Lawson, Bojana Novakovic, Damon Herriman, Patrick Brammall, Lisa McCune, Erin James, Kim Gyngell, TJ Power, Kate Box, Kate Mulvany, Alan Dukes, Genevieve Hegney, Zoe Carides, Ben Lawson, Tasneem Roc, Paul Gleeson, Lachy Hulme and Russell Dykstra.

THE LITTLE DEATH should be released later this year. I thoroughly recommend it.