Tag Archives: Jodine Muir


One of Shaw’s first commercial successes, “Arms and the Man” was first produced at London’s Avenue Theatre in spring 1894. The title is taken from the opening line of Virgil’s “Aeneid,” Arma virumque cano (Of arms and the man I sing). It tells the tale of a young Bulgarian lady named Raina Petkoff, whose fiance is an officer in the Serbo-Bulgarian War of 1885.

Raina is a romantic young girl who has an overly idealistic view of war. She is engaged to Sergius, a handsome ineffectual young officer with an equally romantic attitude towards war. In the first act an escaping enemy soldier, Bluntschli, breaks into Raina’s bedroom. He is a practical sort and tries to convince her of the realities of war. It makes more sense to carry choclates than ammunition he tells her. She lets him escape; clearly she has become attracted to him. In the second act the soldiers return and bring with them Bluntschli who has helped them in moving their armies, since as a pragmatist, he is willing to fight for whichever side pays. Now he has to deal with the romantic Sergius for the love of Raina.

Arms and the Man is one of Shaw’s most popular plays. Though it was written in 1894, its theme is highly contemporary. A gentle but firm satire, Arms and the Man lampoons romantic notions of love and war.

Directed by Linda Beattie with cast Jodine Muir, Denise Kitching, Angeline Andrews,  Amrik Tumber, Nicholas Gledhill, Ross Scott, Will Reilly.

ARMS AND THE MAN is playing the Depot Theatre, 142 Addison Road, Marrickville between September 21 and 24. All  shows start at 8 pm.

For more about Arms and the Man, visit http://ticketing.sydneyfringe.com/fringe/index.html?event/arms_and_the_man/057b27ae-9cde-48ef-bc62-dc9f2e9fb7ff/
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The Diary Of Anne Frank @ The New Theatre

Anne Frank- inset
Inset plc- father- James Bean and daughter- Justina Ward try to get through the hell of Nazi Germany in The Diary Of Anne Frank . Featured pic- A cast shot. Production photos by Matthias Engesser

This is Anne Frank’s story, told through her diaries. It makes for tough reading, or more to the point tough viewing, in the current New Theatre production of the 1955 stage adaptation by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett.

Sam Thomas’ eloquent revival brings her painful and sad story to life. Tragically, Anne lived her last few years with her family in hiding, never knowing if, in the next moment, they will be discovered and transferred to a death camp.

Continue reading The Diary Of Anne Frank @ The New Theatre



How often do you see a funny existential play that examines the reason and nature of theatre, life, death, meaning and the sheer randomness of the universe?

A man, played impressively by Heath Ivey-Law, walks into a comfortable middle class lounge room, mistaking it for a toilet, sees the audience and is embarrassed. He attempts to go back out of the room but the door will not open. He unsuccessfully tries the doors on the other two walls which only leaves the invisible fourth wall. After some deliberately predictable miming the fourth wall does turn out to be impenetrable. The man is joined by a woman, played with confidence and humour by Jodine Muir, who mistakes the room for a toilet and similarly cannot escape the room. As they can see the audience they begin to wonder if they may be in a play. Neither character can remember anything prior to entering the room. In a profound and revealing question the woman asks, “Perhaps I didn’t exist before I walked on stage?”

The actors discuss the motivation and philosophies of the playwright, Simon Dodd, from various perspectives. The masculine and feminine perspectives are explored, and in this case the man is the more philosophical and cerebral character, whereas the woman is much more practical and grounded in this world. Plaything directly questions the relationships between playwrights, the actors, critics and the audience. Does the audience come for escapism, philosophical musings or for a challenging and thoughtful evening?

Plaything contains many theatre jokes and references. The actors attempt to work out what the next plot point could be and try to trigger events by calling out cues. Peter Adams performs well in his brief role and is one of these critical plot points. The young couple are joined on stage by an older couple, played with elegant and appropriate ham acting by Richard Cotter and Tricia Youlden, which gives the play another level of dynamism and an opportunity to explore youth, optimism and exuberance and to compare these attributes with experience, wisdom and the jaded acceptance of ones fate.

Simon Dodd’s PLAYTHING manages to be entertaining and philosophical whilst cleverly exploring why playwrights write, actors act and audiences go to the theatre.

PLAYTHING was performed at Factory Theatre, Marrickville as part of this years’  Sydney Comedy Festival.