Tag Archives: Christopher Hamilton

Cabaret In The Day : I’ll Follow My Secret Heart @ Mosman Arts Gallery

Featured photo- singer Christopher Hamilton.

The second of the 2017 Cabaret In The Day season was the wonderful I’LL FOLLOW MY SECRET HEART, with maestro Glenn Amer on piano and starring Christopher Hamilton

Hamilton has appeared in many musicals and plays in both professional and community theatre including The Pirates of Penzance, Paris, A Song to Sing O!,Vice, Man of La Mancha, The Hatpin, The Producers, Sweeney Todd, Les Miserables, The Venetian Twins and narrating Peter and the Wolf.

This show was a great nostalgia trip, with the performance looking at the career and songs of two of Britain’s greatest 20th Century songsmiths – the dashing Ivor Novello and the ultra sophisticated Noel Coward. Both composers remain the ‘gold standard’ of wit and romance, their works evergreen favourites.

The show opened stirringly with Novello’s 1914 patriotic Keep The Home Fires Burning . Amer then told us a bit about Novello’s life (he was described as ‘ the British Valentino ‘ , terribly handsome, who wrote seven musicals – yet apparently couldn’t sing!) .

Hamilton, dapper and very elegant in black and gold with cravat and tie pin, then launched into the liltingly romantic I Can Give You The Starlight from the 1939 musical The Dancing Years. Also from that musical we then heard the romantic infectious Waltz of My Heart . We then learnt that between the Wars Novello moved to Hollywood where he worked as a script doctor.

Amer then swept into the swirling passionate, longing, yearning title song from the 1935 Glamorous Night .

We then jumped to Novello’s comic songs and Hamilton then, through gritted teeth, performed the biting, witty And Her Mother Came Too.

Amer then talked further about Novello’s luxurious, flamboyant somewhat scandalous gay life and his links to and influences upon Coward. Amer then played Someday My Heart Will Awake from Novello’s King’s Rhapsody.

We then heard more about the rise and rise of Coward and how Novello’s work generally went out of fashion and he sadly passed away in 1951.

Amer and Hamilton performed one of Novello’s most famous songs We’ll Gather Lilacs from Perchance to Dream (1945).

Hamilton swiftly changed from his black to a white dinner jacket while Amer talked more about Coward and his various auto)biographies, letters, plays and aphorisms.

Another duet was enchantingly performed I’ll See You Again. We then heard the title song of this particular show I’ll Follow My Secret Heart, again as a duet , which lead to more discussion about how both Novello and Coward were gay with Coward being more discreet about it.

Hamilton then launched into Cowards’ Mad About The Boy.

Amer then talked about how Coward moved internationally (Bermuda, Jamaica , Switzerland) for tax reasons but always remained at heart an Englishman.

We then heard (with Big Ben chimes on the piano) the stirring, moving London Pride written during the 1941 Blitz. We then heard the jaunty , bouncy A Bar on the Piccolo Marina with its tongue twisting rhythms .This was followed by the delightful Dance Little Lady Dance with its emphatic rhythms . Amer then performed a powerful captivating solo Gypsy Melody on piano .

Next we jumped to the delicious witty Nina, with its infectious Latin rhythms and tongue twisting lyrics. We were then treated to a provoking, sarcastic and haughty Why Do the Wrong People Travel ? another duet for Amer and Hamilton.

Three classic Coward pieces followed: a breathless Mad Dogs and Englishmen, the witty I’ve Been to A Marvellous Party and the blistering, pleading, eventually furious Don’t Put Your Daughter On The Stage Mrs Worthington.

Amer gave a stellar performance of the rather strange Uncle Harry which was followed by a sad, reflective If Love Were All , which is regarded as autobiographical and is from Coward’s 1929 Bitter Sweet. The final song was a duet, a wistful, romantic version of The Dream is Over.

The audience vociferously cheered and applauded at the end leading to the encore of three Coward songs from his The Girl Who Came to SupperLondon, What Ho Mrs Briskett and the music hall like Saturday Night at the Rose and Crown.

We were then thanks by artistic director Melvyn Morrow and given a sneak peek of next week’s show Broadway Babies with the sizzling powerhouse Adele Johnston.

Running time 90 minutes without interval.

I’LL FOLLOW MY SECRET HEART,  part of the Cabaret in the Day concert series, took place at the Mosman Art Gallery on the 16th July.

The Mystery Of Edwin Drood

James Jonathon and Jessica James Moody in THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD
James Jonathon and Jessica James Moody in THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD is a show-within-a-show unfolding among the company of “London’s Music Hall Royale” in 1895. This musical won the Tony Award for Best Musical and Bankstown Theatre Company’s production makes for a highly entertaining evening. The very talented cast, director and production crew ensures the audience is part of the action and enjoys this music hall melodrama.

The musical is loosely based on the unfinished novel of the same name by Charles Dickens who, as “The Chairman”, played with flare by Les Asmussen our Master of Ceremonies for the night, says  “Mr. Charles Dickens was full halfway through the creation of The Greatest Mystery Novel Of Our Time, when he committed the one ungenerous deed of his noble career: He Died, leaving behind not the slightest hint as to the outcome he had intended for his bizarre and uncompleted puzzle” Thus the audience is left to select the murderer from a range of suspects.

Rupert Holmes, who wrote book, music and lyrics, does not focus on the murder of Drood but rather on the antics of the characters that make up the musical hall troupe. The story is set in “Cloisterham” and deals with John Jasper, a Jekyll-and-Hyde choirmaster played with full gusto by Stephen Halstead, who is madly in love with his music student, the beautiful Miss Rosa Bud, acted & beautifully sung by Rebecca Carter. Miss Bud is, in turn, engaged to Jasper’s nephew, young Edwin Drood, portrayed by a very polished Courtney Glass. Drood disappears mysteriously one stormy Christmas Eve – but has he actually been murdered or…?

We’re into Act Two, the story is in choas, and the characters begin lobbying the audience for solutions to their problems. Was it the wicked choirmaster, Drood’s uncle? Or could it have been Helena or Neville Landless (Jessica James Moody and James Jonathon), the Ceylon born twins who both have their reasons for wanting Drood out of the way? Or perhaps the very Reverend Crisparkle (Simon Fry) who hides dark secrets or the comic drunken Durdles (Ben Dodd) or Bazzard (Robert Taylor) … or maybe the mysterious Princess Puffer (Victoria Wildie), almost everyone is a possible suspect! Deputy (Greg Thornton) and Mr James Throttle (Vince Cairncross) add to the strange assortment of characters in the mystery.

The director Christopher Hamilton ensures the action moves along in ordered madness. Musical direction by Jayne Hamilton supports the singers with two piano accompanists (herself and Greg Crease) which form the orchestra. A clever and effective use of a series of paintings directed onto a large background screen place the audience in different locations. The musical hall set and detailed costumes further enhance this Victorian atmosphere.

A fun night is had by all with different outcomes each night depending on the audience vote.

The final performance of THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD is this afternoon at 4pm at the Bankstown Arts Centre, 5 Olympic Parade, Bankstown.