Arts forum

STARTED FROM THE BOTTOM : SPRING PARTY @ AMBUSH GALLERY WATERLOO

The good  folk at the Ambush Gallery in Waterloo are inviting members of the public along to their Spring Party where you enjoy free food, drink and music and listen to some lightning talks by local identities who started at the very bottom and have become success stories in their own right.

The talks will be given by Camilla Gulli, Content Marketing Lead at Vodaphone AustraliaAdam Jacobs, Co-Founder and Managing Director, The Iconic, Mary HuangFounder of The Indigo Project and Caroline Shields, Co-Founder of Be An Unfucker.

The event will take place at the Ambush Gallery, 4 James Street, Waterloo between 6-9 pm on the 22nd September.

For more about Spring Mixer and to rsvp-  http://ga.co/spring-mixer
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NAVIGATOR : A PUBLIC FORUM WITH QUENTIN DEMPSTER AND RICHARD GOODWIN

Join Quentin Dempster and Richard Goodwin at a public forum for some thought provoking discussion and one last look at Richard Goodwin’s Navigator: bringing together select artworks, sculptures, drawings and models produced over the past 25 years.

As an artist and architect greatly concerned with the built environment and public space, Richard Goodwin describes his work as “existing between public and private space”. This will be used as a provocation for discussion on regional development, the built environment and the role of culture and quality of life in urban design and planning for Western Sydney.

The panel will be led by Walkley Award-winning journalist, author and broadcaster Quentin Dempster AM best known for his decades of work with the ABC. Panelists Richard Goodwin, Emma Husar MP, Craig Butler, Assistant General Manager of Penrith City Council and the Hon Peter Anderson AM, Chairman of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts, will discuss their thoughts on our relationship with our local built environment. This will be followed by audience question and answer time.

Come along and take one last look at the Gallery’s Winter Exhibition Suite, featuring the work of artist and architect Richard Goodwin and be part of the Big Ideas discussion. Light refreshments will be served.

The exhibition is on display at the Penrith Regional Gallery until the 20th August 2017.

For more information visit the website –

http://www.penrithregionalgallery.org/

 

 

YOUNG VISIONARIES @ WEWORK PYRMONT

YOUNG VISIONARIES is a celebration of local creatives, fashion, arts, technology and social good.

All are welcome to attend an evening of inspirational short talks, music and mingling to end the week with a bang!

The evening will feature stories of awesome creators who are using technology to push the boundaries of creative expression or to influence change across multiple disciplines like tech, fashion, the arts and science.

Presenters include-

Ollie Henderson : on culture as an expression of the political.

Sulange Cunin : on founding Cube Rider, a STEM program taking students on real space mission and more…

Mix and mingle and with some awesome young visionaries making a difference in their industry, get inspired and unwind with drinks on the good folk at Alpha Box & Dice and Sofi Spritz.

There will be live music and Rollie will be giving away a pair of shoes from their latest winter range to one lucky winner – be in it to win it!

DETAILS : 
Friday 7th April between 6 and 9 pm at WeWork Pyrmont, 100 Harris Street, Pyrmont.

For more about Young Visionaries, visit http://ga.co/young-vis
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CULTURE CLUB DEBATES THE WHY AND WHEREFORE OF FESTIVALS

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A very exciting and vibrant discussion chaired by Fenella Kernebone who led the panel of Rachel Healy (Adelaide Festival) and Wesley Enoch (Sydney Festival) and Fergus Linehan (Edinburgh International Festival) and asks why we put on festivals, what they offer artists and communities, and dives into future festival trends both locally and internationally.

To begin with, a bit of background in regards to each of the panellists.

Wesley Enoch has been a theatre director and writer for over 25 years specialising in Aboriginal Theatre and cultural stories. He has been the Artistic Director of companies including Queensland Theatre Company 2010-15, Ilbijerri 2003-06 and Kooemba Jdarra 1994-97, as well as the Festival of Pacific Arts – Australia in 2008 and 2012. Wesley has been appointed the Director of Sydney Festival for the period from 2017 to 2019.

Continue reading CULTURE CLUB DEBATES THE WHY AND WHEREFORE OF FESTIVALS

CULTURE CLUB ON NIJINSKY AND STRAVINSKY @ THE UTZON ROOM

For balletomanes this was enthralling. Artistic Director David McAllister and music director and chief conductor Nicolette Fraillon from the Australian Ballet talked to Caroline Baum about the Company’s upcoming production of Nijinsky choreographed by internationally renowned John Neumeier which opens next week here in Sydney after a hugely  successful season in Melbourne.

The premiere of the Nijinsky/ Stravinsky work Sacre du Printemps ( The Rite of Spring ) took place in Paris in May 1913 and famously caused a riot In the audience. What can we expect from this new work by Neumeier?!

Baum began by asking McAllister how he managed to obtain the rights to Neumeier’s work given that it is a work tightly controlled by the choreographer.

McAllister replied that several years ago now he attended performances and had talks with Neumeier but nothing really came of it until 2011 when they met again and made more definite arrangements. Continue reading CULTURE CLUB ON NIJINSKY AND STRAVINSKY @ THE UTZON ROOM

CULTURE CLUB HI – TECH STORIES @ SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE

The latest scintillating panel in the exciting series of Culture Club talks was entitled HI-TECH STORIES . Chaired by Fenella Kernebone it considered how the use of sensors, lasers, virtual reality, online content, digital-real-time-audience-interaction and for example text messages have now been included and spiced up special effects and storylines for decades – artists and audiences continue to fervently embrace new technologies as fast as we can fund them. Lee Lewis (Griffin Theatre) TL Uglow (Google Creative Lab) and Gideon Obarzanek (ex Chunky Move) discussed the latest developments in creative technology in the theatrical world, its outcomes and effects ,particularly in theatre and dance.

One of the country’s leading directors, Lee Lewis is currently Artistic Director of the Griffin Theatre Company. Her production credits include working with companies Griffin, Bell Shakespeare, Sydney Theatre Company, Belvoir, ATYP and Sydney Festival.

TL Uglow , a contemporary writer and speaker on innovation and digital futures, leads part of Google’s Creative Lab specialising in work with cultural organisations, artists, writers, and producers. TL creates experiments using digital technology at the boundaries of traditional cultural practice – across theatre, literature, history, cinema, music, science and the circus.

Gideon Obarzanek is a director and choreographer, and is Artistic Associate with the Melbourne Festival, Chair of the Melbourne Fringe Festival and board member of Critical Path – Choreographic Research Centre based in Sydney. Gideon founded dance company Chunky Move in 1995 and was CEO until 2012.

Panel Chairperson Fenella Kernebone is the newly appointed Head of Curation for TedX Sydney and a radio and television presenter. She presents By Design on Radio National and The Sound Lab on Triple J.”

How do audiences today embrace the use of technology? How do the panel members embrace technology? Kernebone asked these and other burning questions and began with Where are we now with art and technology?

Lewis replied that she was caught between fear and hope .Uglow replied by saying it could all possibly be about the budget and funding and how culture has become institutionalised. Obarzanek replied by referring back to his work in the 1990’s  and how now the issue is ‘ liveness’ and how people want to digitally interact and be in the same place as the performance. He continued by saying that technology is always changing and always has a role in performance – now it has become more seamless.

The next issue that was raised was – if the tecnology doesn’t work do you keep going ? and how now so much art depends on the use of technology. There was then talk of fashioning and enhancing the audience experience and how nowadays performances can be shared and viewed around the world.

Obarzanek talked about his work with Chunky Move and the use of technology as well as film in performance and asked when using technology (as in his Glow for example) do you embody the performance as a performer, a character or as a kinetic image?

He also looked at the history of dance and storytelling , mentioning in particular Loie Fuller and Alwin Nikolais,  the use of projections and for Obarzanek’s Glow how light and image became part of the choreography.

He became fascinated with Reuben Margolin’s work with ‘string sculptures’ and this led to the work Connected  with Chunky Move. Obarzanek said you need to engage the audience and help them appreciate what is out there .He then talked about working with large groups of people ( the choirs in his Assembly) who were not used to moving and how he used digital items when working with Sydney Dance and how he has used technology constantly.

Kernebone then asked how has technology shaped how the way that they work?

Lewis replied that she wants to develop a more intimate relationship with her audience, that you have to care about your audience.

Uglow talked about one of her latest projects featuring a network between phone and computers with writers talking about projects and technology in the real world.

Obarzanek spoke about the changes in technology and that now you can shift and play with all sorts of various apps, and how nowadays the division between audience and performer, between professional and amateur and those who are untrained, is quite blurred.

Uglow raised the issue of in today’s world of  the constant use of mobiles, the framing of the object in the theatre, non linear construction of narrative and ownership of apps, licences and so on.

Lewis replied that yes there is now much more pressure on companies and performers to be much much better and how audiences are now more visually aware and how with technology they can provide feedback and that companies have to listen.

Lewis mentioned she would love an app or something that could one day come along and change the body, change the costume in performance – she wants the magic of theatre, of seeming to be able to teleport someone on stage, and instant scene changes…

Obarzanek talked about his collaborations with scientists, of images and light, his trip to Java and Lewis talked about live streaming of theatrical performances.

In summing up and answer to audience questions Lewis remarked that her work with Uglow has made her realise how traditional the theatrical form is and spoke about cultural traditions and preservation of the art form and the necessity for working across artforms and genres.

We then ran out of time .Kernebone thanked the panel and the session closed.

Running time – 75 mins ( roughly )
Hi-Tech stories as part of the Culture Club talks series was presented at the Utzon room of the Sydney Opera House 4 October

 

CULTURE CLUB : JOHN CLEESE IN CONVERSATION

Featured image- John Cleese holding up a pencil. Cleese explained to the audience that, contrary to the high tech young generation, when he writes he simply uses  a pencil, a rubber and an exercise book. All images by Ben Apfelbaum.

John Cleese is the latest artist to appear in the Sydney Opera House’s excellent Culture Club : Exploring The Arts  discussion series. Ann Mossop, head of Talks and Ideas at the House, came on stage to start proceedings, and  then introduced Cleese and the evenings’ emcee James Valentine.  Cleese responded to wide ranging questions by Valentine and in the last quarter of an hour, he fielded questions from the floor.

Sometimes celebrities can disappoint when they are put on the spot however this was not the case with Cleese. Cleese came across as warm and open and expressed his views on a range of issues.

Cleese spoke about his concern that the theatre world is too comfortable with the status quo and would  rather put on a fresh production  of an  old show rather than take the risk on coming up with a new work.  He felt this was the case with both sides of the ‘equation’ – on one side, the producers and other side, the audiences, who prefer to go with what they know. Continue reading CULTURE CLUB : JOHN CLEESE IN CONVERSATION

CULTURE CLUB : STATE OF THE ARTS @ UTZON ROOM SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE

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Panel in Discussion. Photography by Yaya Stempler.

We were welcomed by Ann Mossop who then introduced the chairperson Monique Schafter . Schafter then introduced the high-flying panel – Nick Atkins , Michael Lynch CBE AM , Lily Shearer and Tamara Winikoff OAM and there was an intense , exuberant discussion.

Nick Atkins is currently the Producer for Q Programs at The Joan and Board Member of PACT Centre for Emerging Artists. His work at The Q has seen him develop and implement the Young Artist Program. Previously Nick worked as the Associate Producer and Co-Artistic Director of Crack Theatre Festival. From this role he collaboratively programmed the festivals presentation, panel and master class series.

Michael Lynch has led some of Australia’s most prominent arts companies including Sydney Theatre Company, the Australia Council for the Arts and the Sydney Opera House. From 2002 to 2009 he was chief executive of the South Bank Centre in London and has also served as Director of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and as a board member of Film Victoria. Michael was the CEO of the West Kowloon Cultural District in Hong Kong until 2015 and is now the chair of CIRCA as well as the Sydney Community Foundation.He has just been appointed interim head of the National Art School. Continue reading CULTURE CLUB : STATE OF THE ARTS @ UTZON ROOM SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE